Mastic and unsanded grout


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Old 07-13-16, 11:03 PM
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Mastic and unsanded grout

Hey we hired a guy to tile our bathroom floor. He had used unsanded grout for less then 1/4 inch grout lines. The grouts already coming out and it's been less then 2 weeks. Unsanded grout should be ok. I think he didnt mix the grout correctly.

Our contractor just pointed out to us also that for some reason the tile guy used mastic to lay down the floor instead of thinset. Do we need to take up the tile because of potential mold damage from using mastic? We have small kids and they love to splash water all over the place during bath time. So it will get wet.
 
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Old 07-14-16, 08:28 AM
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You hired this done, make the guy come back and do it right.

Has he been paid yet?
 
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Old 07-14-16, 11:39 AM
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Unsanded grout is for 1/8" grout lines and smaller. Grout lifting is a sign of movement. Mold is not the issue with mastic, it is the fact that it is not rated for wet areas. Technically, your floor is not a wet area such as inside a shower itself. How big are the tiles he put down and what kind of prep did he do to the floor before laying the tiles?
 
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Old 07-14-16, 12:49 PM
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I don't have confidence this person knows how to install tile correctly. You should make him remove what he did and return the floor to its original condition and he should refund all monies including any materials you may have supplied.

Then, let us know what you have as the base so we can advise how to proceed. If the kids are that splash happy, you'll want to take additional steps to waterproof the floor before installing the tiles.

Jaz
 
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Old 07-14-16, 02:11 PM
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We already paid the guy and personally we don't want him to touch anything more in our house (we had other sub standard things he did ie drywall). I was just curious if it was in our best interest to rip the tile up and start over with thin set? The tile seems to be moving so maybe that is why the grout is coming out as mentioned below.
 
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Old 07-14-16, 02:34 PM
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Take up the tile and start over. It will most likely come up easy.
 
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Old 07-14-16, 02:40 PM
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Mastic can not be used on larger tiles. Just like it never hardens in a bucket, it will never harden under a large tile.

We can walk you through if you decide to redo on your own.

If he is licensed in your state, you may have some restitution possible. I am not familiar with the laws in your state however. You can also file a claim against his insurance, provided he has insurance.
 
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Old 07-14-16, 05:21 PM
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I don't know of any insurance that covers being a hack. Insurance has nothing to do with filling in small claims.

Drywall? Real professional tile setters do not usually also do drywall work. Some may be licensed in more than one trade category, but I will bet he is not qualified to do tile work and has no license, just works out of a pickup truck.

Next time hire a qualified tile setter and check them out.

Jaz
 
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Old 07-15-16, 05:08 AM
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Around here it's called a bond - an insurance policy that more or less guarantees the quality or completion of the work. While it is commonplace with big contracts I doubt a small contractor would have it.

I agree it's best to hire contractors that specialize in a particle field. While I'm good at doing a lot of different things, painting is the only thing I'm a pro at. I'm proud of the tile work I've done at my house but I also know the workmanship and time spent isn't as good as a tile man would have done.
 
 

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