Replacing floor tile and grout

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Old 10-13-18, 08:45 AM
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Replacing floor tile and grout

I trying to become more handy around the house and figured this would be a good project to start with. I have a broken tile which I will replace. Have plenty of spare tile. In a 3 x 4 area around the broken tile, the grout has been slowly chipping away and I some spots is pretty much gone. This is the only area where this is happening. It is a high traffic are. Couple questions:

1. How do I get the new grout to tie into the existing grout that Im not replacing?

2. I have a few other spots near this area where the surface of the grout is chipping away alittle. Any suggestions on how to fix that?
 
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Old 10-13-18, 09:06 AM
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You can use a grout file along with a narrow chisel/screwdriver to remove the grout. It's pretty much a crap shoot as to how well the new grout will blend. Grout can fade and/or absorb dirt which will change the color some. Plus there is no guarantee that the same color grout made at 2 different times will be the same exact color.
 
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Old 10-13-18, 09:32 AM
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I have a hand grout saw Im going to use to remove the grout. I found some new grout that is pretty close to the current color. Plan on using sanded grout since the joint is wide.
 
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Old 10-13-18, 11:14 AM
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If you can't get the new grout to match to your satisfaction, you can always use a grout colorant and recolor all the grout. It's a little bit of a PIA, but not too bad. The colorant I've used a couple times in the past is made by Aquamix; the oldest installation is now about 6 years old and is still holding up very well.
 
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Old 10-13-18, 11:31 AM
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So are you good for the tile removal?
 
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Old 10-13-18, 01:44 PM
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I think Im good on the removal and replacing the broken tile. Been reading and watching videos on all that. Let me clarify one of my questions. Im not so worried about matching color than I am making the new grout join into the existing grout when Im putting the new grout down. Maybe Im overthinking this since its my first tile project.
 
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Old 10-13-18, 03:27 PM
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All you have to to is get the old grout end cut somewhat vertical where the new grout ties in so the new grout is full depth. What you want to avoid is having a shallow taper and a very thin layer of new on top of old. Also be sure to get the get the grout consistency right (not too wet) and use as little water as possible when cleaning.
 
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Old 10-14-18, 02:52 AM
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use as little water as possible when cleaning.
I made that mistake on my first floor tile job. Too much water can wash/bleach out the grout's color. Fortunately for me it was just a hearth and it wasn't a big deal to restore the color with grout dye.
 
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Old 10-14-18, 04:25 AM
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Of course the other option is to remove all the grout, some extra work but nothing will stand out as being different!
 
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Old 10-14-18, 06:43 AM
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Thanks for the advice everyone! Doing all of the grout would be optimal, but were talking about 400-500sq/ft which may be a bit more than Im willing to do right now. We will see how the repair goes and then go from there. My wife said shed still love me even if I messed it up Will so this next weekend.
 
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Old 10-14-18, 09:24 PM
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Like BruceH said, the biggest thing is not to have any shallow areas of new grout, as they will chip and flake away.

It'll be strongest with straight-up-and-down sides, or (like any cement patching job) even a slight overhang of the old grout over the new — as long as the old grout is still strong and solid even where it hangs over.

(From getting all of my dental work done at a dental school, I know that even dentists use the same technique when prepping a tooth to be filled. In fact, you might consider taking a page from them, and using a Dremel-or-equivalent rotary tool to shape the edges of your old grout where it'll meet the new. Only if you have one handy, along with a suitable bit.)
 
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