Uneven Showerpan

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-31-19, 07:34 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 33
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Uneven Showerpan

I have a shower that failed. I replaced the drywall shower walls with cement board only to discover that the shower pan was uneven. I have a significant dip on one of the four corners. My question is, can I level the shower pan from below? I know I may have to shift the plumbing a bit to match but I donít think it will be a significant shift as all I want to do is level out one corner. Any thoughts and suggestions are appreciated.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-31-19, 08:16 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,027
Received 679 Votes on 628 Posts
Is this a premolded fiberglass pan, or what?
 
  #3  
Old 08-31-19, 10:13 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 33
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes. It is a pre-made piece set in place. I can’t see how it’s attached at this point though.
 
  #4  
Old 08-31-19, 04:02 PM
W
Member
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Ohio
Posts: 1,884
Received 13 Votes on 13 Posts
My house built in 1963, had a shower start leaking, I went up thru the room below to see what I had, and from the look of it, if there was ANYTHING ever there, it disengrated a long time ago. Paying attention to grout and applications of sealer have kept things dry for now, but since the whole half bath and shower upstairs is in a 60s pastel blue ceramic tile, Im thinking I will have to re do the whole thing, shower floor, shower walls, toilet floor and sink stand, just to get a pan underneath the shower floor, unless there is an inovation I don't know about to do this. (apologies for interupting this post, but thought it might be a similar answer)
 
  #5  
Old 08-31-19, 04:40 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,027
Received 679 Votes on 628 Posts
If it's a fiberglass pan, it is probably set on subfloor so i doubt you could correct it from below. You would likely need to pop the subfloor loose and sister some framing under there along with some subfloor glue in order to raise that corner... probably easier said than done.

Some older pans are made of a type of mortar and were poured in place. They are heavy and over the years that weight and any wetness can cause the framing under them to sag... impossible to correct that... just needs to be torn out and redone. Mortar also is not waterproof so those types of pans, which originally sat on plywood, will often be sitting on nothing but the joists once the subfloor rots away.
 
  #6  
Old 09-01-19, 09:58 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 33
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
WML13 You describe my bathroom with frightening accuracy. The only thing I haven't done yet is attempt to view my pan from below. I want to try to jack it into place using a bottle jack and some dimensional lumber but it's going to be a while before I can attempt it. Theoretically, if there is, or was in your case , something underneath, you should have able to get something in there for support. At least, that is my hope.
 
  #7  
Old 09-01-19, 10:02 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 33
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
@XSleeper I yet have an idea of what’s below. I know from removing some tile on the side of the pan, there is a subfloor component. I also know that the one corner is where the dominant portion of the water was flowing down from when the shower began to fail with the previous home owner. From what I can see, there isn’t any mortar but I won’t know for sure until I open the ceiling below. If I don’t have mortar, do you think it would be possible to jack up the corner and then sister a support to keep it level?
 
  #8  
Old 09-01-19, 10:21 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Ohio
Posts: 1,884
Received 13 Votes on 13 Posts
I didnt want to do it, but the only way I could see what I had was to open up a hole in the dining room ceiling big enough to get a small camera up there and snap pictures of from different angles. (a lot less damage to the plaster ceiling and the photos gave me a record) I have nothing to jack up anything except the plaster ceiling, so i figure my only option is to tear it out the shower floor and reconstuct it. I want an instruction book to study before I attempt that!
 
  #9  
Old 09-02-19, 12:17 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 33
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The camera is a great idea. I’m going to borrow that one today since it will save me the effort of opening the ceiling just In case there’s another issue.
 
  #10  
Old 09-02-19, 02:48 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 33
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
So I can confirm that I have the original plywood base underneath my shower pan. Now back to my original question, how do I raise and secure the pan corner from a 3/4" gap between the pan and wall to a 1/8" gap that the other three corners have? I'm wondering if I just shimmed between the joist and the ply, would that be enough to correct the dip in that corner? Alternatively, I'm wondering about access from the side either from the closet that is on the other side of the shower pan or the adjoining wall and attempting the sistering maneuver. Thoughts?
__________________________________________________________________________________
I did decide to go back and take a look at the closet and to my surprise, the drywall in the closet behind the corner of the shower pan in question is not secured. I am able to see the shower pan fully just by looking down the access panel they left me. I'm fairly certain that I can simply open the lower half of the wall and add a shim directly to the pan. This may be the first bit of good that has come from the quick fix the previous homeowner attempted. Unless someone can think of why I shouldn't attempt this, I may be able to get onto the second shower sooner than anticipated.
 
  #11  
Old 09-02-19, 03:25 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,027
Received 679 Votes on 628 Posts
If you can shim it from above, that's great. But it's not great if the shower pan is not sitting on a level floor, fully supported. One shim under 1 corner will cause it to bow when stepped on.

If you have to shim it from below...

Like I said, its anyones guess how hard it will be. Your subfloor is nailed to the joists, and you can't get to those nails. Try to pry the subfloor up off the joists. After you make a big hole in the ceiling under the shower, use a big wonder bar to try to pry between the joist and subfloor. Can't predict how easy or hard it will be.

Insert shims under the subfloor once you get it pried up if possible. Or use a couple 2x4s and a floor jack (one horizontal, one vertical on the floor jack) under the subfloor if needed. If you can get it to move with the jack, put some construction screws through the horizontal 2x4 to sister the joist before you let the jack down.
 
  #12  
Old 09-27-19, 05:30 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 33
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Just a quick update. I did manage see the subfloor by opening a small hole in the adjoining wall. Sad to say, the subfloor is in such bad condition that Iím afraid any work on even a portion on it would require a complete re-gut. The shower pan has points that act as legs but there is no way to make an adjustment that doesnít put the integrity of the pan at risk. Gonna have to wait to find out when it all has to be done over which is fine. The redesign already calls for a tub in place of the existing pan.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: