Wallpaper Removal/Replacement Problem

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Old 06-27-17, 07:33 AM
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Wallpaper Removal/Replacement Problem

I've searched a few threads but haven't seen anything directly on this point. We removed some old (25+ years), textured wall paper from one of our bathrooms. The adhesive, which appears to have been heavily applied and has taken on the texture of the wallpaper, is proving almost impossible to remove without damaging the sheetrock. We've tried commercial and DIY sprays, scraping, sanding...nothing seems to work. Our preference is to paint but at this point we're open to almost any idea(s). If anyone has any thoughts we'd really appreciate it!
 
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Old 06-27-17, 07:53 AM
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Skim coat it with joint compound. Don't try to remove all of it. Hire someone if you can't do it yourself.
 
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Old 06-27-17, 08:55 AM
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Remove all the adhesive you reasonably can then cover with Zinsser Gardz primer and then skim coat, prime and paint.
 
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Old 06-27-17, 09:40 AM
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I agree with SS, you need to seal any remaining adhesive with either an oil base primer or Gardz. Same thing for any torn drywall face paper.
 
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Old 06-27-17, 10:00 AM
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What's wrong with Zinzer123? Zinzer Guard has the consistency of milk.
 
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Old 06-27-17, 10:08 AM
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Traditionally you could only use a solvent based primer but then they came out with Gardz which is a primer sealer. It is formulated to seal, not cover. I'm not aware of any other latex primer that is recommended for use over wallpaper adhesive or torn drywall paper.
 
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Old 06-28-17, 05:01 AM
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I just used this to seal my walls after removing 23 year old wallpaper. Couldn't seem to get all the stickiness off so this did the trick. It worked great. Seals completely. It's the exact same product as Gardz, just repackaged for paint stores. It was much cheaper at my BM store than in this link - about $27 I think.

https://www.amazon.com/ALLPRIME-Wate.../dp/B01N7ONLAZ
 
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Old 06-28-17, 08:25 AM
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I remember when you did that - it's Gardz in a different can....
 
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Old 06-28-17, 11:10 AM
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You don't have to skim coat.

You just need the right solution to soften and remove the residual paste. Back then, fabric-backed vinyl was installed with clay-based paste adhesive. It probably looks tan or brown. Having aged that long, it is tough and you need a good water-based solution to get it off. If the paper surface of the wallBOARD is dark brown, that indicates that it an old type of wallboard that has a relatively tender surface, once it gets wet. I have always ordered Safe-and-Simple wallcovering removal concentrate from a guy in California. They used to be wallpaper removers and decided to formulate their own solution and it's good. Non-toxic, biodegradable, orderless and reasonably priced. ********
**** You mix 2 oz/gallon of warm water in a garden sprayer, soak the wall in a 3'-4'width. by the time you finish putting it on, it will have soaked in. spray another coat on and immediately cover it with a strip of painters plastic. It will stick to the wall because its wet. smooth out the air bubbles and let it soak there for five-ten minutes. When you peel off the painters plastic, spray it one more time and let it "work" its magic. The paste should be soft and you can cautiously scrape the paste off the wallboard. If the paper surface of the wall board starts to fold up under your scraper blade, stop right away. You'll have to work slow and speed up as you get the hang of it. spray the wall when necessary to continue to soften the clay based paste. I use a werner scraper with a replaceable razor blade but, when it is new it is extremely sharp and you'll have to work to scrape off the softened paste with just the right angle to the wall so that you can scrape away the soften paste without damaging the paper surface of the wallboard, under the paste. It's a slow tedious process but, you can do it. Once you have one full length of the wallboard (3'-4' wide) done. Have a bucket ready with a solution of one cup of (Dry) TSP pre-paint cleaner. Use a micro fiber cloth because it is soft and won't damage the tender wallboard. The TSP is strong enough to cut any residual paste left after scraping it. Have a separate 5 gallon bucket of clean warm water with a little vinegar in it that you can't wring out your microfiber towel in when it gets too much clay in it. If you leave a little film of clay adhesive on the wall, don't sweat it (I'll explain later). Once you make it around the room you'll curse the guy who hung the paper, ions ago. But, that is how they did it then. They didn't know that the wallboard needed a vapor proof barrier to prevent the water-based (in this case, clay/water based paste) from soaking into the wallboard. As it cured, it practically bonded with the paper on the surface of the wallboard and that's why its such a pain to get off.
Once the paste if off, it will have to dry for two days and you'll need a two-day break, by then.
Before anything else, once the walls are dry, you'll want to replace any of the old caulk where the wall meets any trim (wood) and patch any cracks and repair any gouges in the wallboard.
Once that is done, apply ONE coat of Zinsser Gardz primer for damaged wall surfaces (Lowes or any good paint store). This stuff is the bomb but, it isn't easy to work with. It's water-based but, wants to set up fairly quickly and is THINNER THAN water. Buy a Micro-fiber roller cover (Lowes) to apply the Gardz to the wall. Those covers hold this thin primer on the cover before and while you are applying it to the walls. Don't over-load your cover and work, initially going Up the wall, slowly because it splatters. If you go DOWN, initially, you'll wear half of whats on the roller cover. Cut-In with a cheap throw-away brush and don't load the brush up too much. either, because Gardz is thin and drips everywhere. Keep the bristles pointing downward. This will prevent the Gardz from seeping down the brush handle and on your hands. Wear disposable gloves and old clothes and sneakers or shoes. If you wear glasses, clean them in soapy water asap after the Gardz is on the wall. When you are finished a wall, take a damp microfiber cloth and wipe splatter off the baseboards and chair rail.
Always let your caulking cure over night. Even the best stuff shrinks and, if painted too soon, It will look like crap if painted early. I always used a urethane elastomer latex adhesive caulk. It will last ten years or more (says lifetime and we all know that ain't so). Cut out any old caulk that is lose. follow your caulk bead with a wet finger (spit works well) and clean your finger off with a damp micro-fiber towel that you'll want to wring out in TSP water before it dries.
If you think I like microfiber towels to work with, you're right. They leave little of anything on the surface that you clean. You can buy a pack of 30 for 18 bucks at Costco. When you wash them, don't use fabric softener- they won't be as absorbent as they will w/o FS. Well, I'm starting to abbreviate so I must be tired and so are you ...of reading all of this. You have have remaining questions, reply.
Good luck...removal and prep-to-paint was my forte. It's not easy and one needs to pay attention to details but, the gratification is worth it.
Even with a microfiber roller cover, it will splatter tiny specs everywhere so protect your floor and furniture. If you can't fininbut, when it dries, it is rock hard, encapsulating everything on the wall so you want to run your hand over the entire surface of the wall insuring that you don't have a foreign matter of divots on the wall before the Gardz application. Gardz is a primer sealer that will literally soak into the wallboard. In two hours, you'll have a smooth surface on which to finish-paint. The sheen of cured Gardz is what I would call satin but, fear not. Even though the first coat of finish paint won't appear to have "covered" very well, The SECOND coat will look super. Always two coat when you paint. It's worth the time and money and will last much longer. I've used the newer "One Coat" paints and trust me when I say that most don't do that well. It's just a gimmick to suck you into their brand.
 

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Old 06-28-17, 12:14 PM
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Just a comment on the above. I applied the Gardz/Allprime with a brush. No issues with dripping or spattering at all.
 
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Old 06-28-17, 04:15 PM
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papernpaste, it sounds like you've done this before

I just want to put another vote in for Gardz, it's almost like a cure-all for damaged drywall.
 
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Old 06-29-17, 05:53 AM
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You are correct. If your handy with a brush, there should be any major issues. It IS runny/thin so I instructed on the side of caution. If you're using a good brush, clean thoroughly with a brush come using bar soap or dish soap and clean all the way to the feral (the metal holding the bristles, under cold running water until there is no more creamy looking liquid the full length of the bristles. If you don't your brush will dry stiff and require cleaning with a liquid brush cleaner, later.
 
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