corner cracked again


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Old 01-31-16, 08:59 AM
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corner cracked again

Hello all two years ago I had same issue to fix it I cut out old tape mudded corner and applied new tape then did the usual feathering out with various sizes of knifes, and this winter the tape has separated again. The House is about 30yrs old so I would have thought settle ling would have stopped by now, I’m going to try attach a picture hopefully someone can steer me in right direction to fix this problem as it’s not just this one corner that tape has separated.


Name:  Cracked Corner.jpg
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  #2  
Old 01-31-16, 09:13 AM
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http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html

Pictures need to be scaled down to web quality and uploaded one at a time.
 
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Old 01-31-16, 09:52 AM
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Made jpg smaller and it attached ok
 
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Old 01-31-16, 09:54 AM
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There are 2 ways to fix it; remove the old tape and redo or just flat tape the side that has cracked open [cut out any loose tape]
 
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Old 01-31-16, 10:03 AM
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What type of joint compound did you use? Regular tape or mesh tape? If you push on the walls does it flex in anyway?
 
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Old 01-31-16, 10:24 AM
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Corners crack most often because the framing is not fastened properly at the corner, allowing each wall to move independently. Unless the framing is fixed, the repair will probably continue to crack. Tape and joint compound are not structural. So if the joint is cracking and opening up, uch as with seasonal changes in temperature, there is something else that is going on there that can't be fixed with just mud and tape.
 
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Old 01-31-16, 12:56 PM
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Ok thanks for all the replies here's the materials I used when I repaired two years ago
CGC Dust Free Drywall Compound and paper tape, knife size from 3" all the way up to 10"
I checked the walls and they did move slightly I would say 1/8"
and without ripping drywall off in the corners how can I confirm bad framing?.
 
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Old 01-31-16, 01:42 PM
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No way without ripping it off. I would suggest removing about 16" wide to expose the framing under that beam and replace with a new piece of sheetrock that has no crack. While its open you can glue and screw the corner or add some blocking as needed.

Your "dust free" compound is probably super soft which doesn't lend well to maximum strength. A setting compound would would be best if you intend to just repair it again.
 
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Old 01-31-16, 02:01 PM
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If you Google "how to frame a corner stud wall" there are lots of pictures to illustrate what might be behind that drywall. Basically, the objective is to tie the walls together mechanically and to provide a nailing surface for the drywall from each direction. Often times when they stand up the second wall everything looks to be as it should, and they forget to nail those corner studs together. If you knew for sure there were no wires snaking through that corner you could drive some long screws through to tie them together. But, IMO, you really need a good look to make this the last time you have to deal with this problem, as suggested.

Bud
 
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Old 01-31-16, 02:30 PM
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I'd pull the existing tape, run some new drywall screws and see if the movement stops. If the 1/8" movement quiets down, ten you have a better chance of success re-taping. For the record, I use setting type compound almost exclusively.
 
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Old 02-01-16, 03:10 AM
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Thanks for Idea's I will grab some screws tonight and remove old tape and install screws see if there's a stud in the corner, for taping when you say setting compound do you mean the self mix kind like "sheetrock 90". Also I've seen 4" paper tape and a tape you wet prior to installing are they hype or should I stick to regular size tape.
 
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Old 02-01-16, 03:17 AM
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As long as the movement stops, you can use the same materials you used prior. It is the movement that is causing the tape to crack, there was nothing wrong with your initial procedures. If it happens again, we may have to do some more exploratory work.
 
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Old 02-01-16, 04:36 AM
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@rick, you said "as it’s not just this one corner that tape has separated." Is there another location, like inside a closet, where drywall removal would be less of a problem? A place where you could open things up to see how they built those corners.

Also, variation between summer and winter humidity inside a home will always affect the framing. Stabilizing the relative humidity between summer and winter might go a long ways towards eliminating this problem. If winter moisture levels are very dry, then the steps to increase that moisture level, like air sealing, will also reduce your energy bills.

Bud
 
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Old 02-01-16, 05:13 AM
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Yes, sheet rock 90 or 45 would work well. They are harder and less likely to crack. I would normally prefill a crack like that. Then once the prefill is dry, tape it as usual with paper tape. Once the tape is dry, I'd cover it with another wide coat of setting compound... then you could use your lightweight mud to skim since it will be softer and easier to sand.
 
 

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