What type of drywall should I use?

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Old 02-17-16, 05:24 PM
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What type of drywall should I use?

I have a bathroom to drywall, I see that most of what my local store carries is the lightweight drywall, is this stuff as good as regular drywall? There is also a product that Menards sells that is mold and moisture resistant drywall.

I believe my house has 1/2 drywall on the ceilings and the walls. The ceiling joists are 16" On center or less. I am planning to install the drywall perpendicular to the joists. The ceiling will be textured. My drywall book specifies either 1/2" or 5/8 In my ceiling application.

Any advice?
 
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Old 02-17-16, 07:21 PM
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is this stuff as good as regular drywall?
Yes. It has the same ratings are "regular" drywall except in fire resistance, which it sounds like you do not need.

I like to use 5/8" on the ceilings regardless of span.
 
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Old 02-17-16, 08:39 PM
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In bathrooms and basements, I recommend using the mold resistant. 1/2" is fine for your ceiling. I use 5/8" when joists are 24" oc.
 
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Old 02-18-16, 04:21 AM
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Does this bath have a shower? if so, what type of texture do you intend to use on the ceiling?
 
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Old 02-18-16, 08:47 AM
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I've heard you can use the lightweight 1/2" rock on 24" centers but I still go the same way as X - 5/8" rock on 24" centers, 1/2" only when 16" oc.
 
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Old 02-18-16, 05:33 PM
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Does this bath have a shower? if so, what type of texture do you intend to use on the ceiling?
The bathroom has a shower. It will have an exhaust fan right above the shower. It will have a stomped texture, which is what the rest of the house has so if I dont match it that room will stick out like a sore thumb. I suppose it dates the house a bit, but in this area even brand new homes tend to have stomped ceilings.
 
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Old 02-18-16, 06:48 PM
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I also only use use 5/8 on a ceiling and no way would I ever use a textured ceiling in a bathroom!!!
Just going to be a mold, mildew, dust collector.
 
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Old 02-18-16, 07:22 PM
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brand new homes tend to have stomped ceilings.
Stomped? Would that be a knock down?
 
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Old 02-18-16, 08:29 PM
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A stomp ceiling is done with a single or double crows foot brush that is rotated as you "stomp" the rolled on texture, which is then left to dry. (See http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-H-R0jTM042...0/IMG_1018.jpg)

Knock down takes it one step farther by using a trowel to slightly flatten the stomped texture.
 
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Old 02-19-16, 04:01 AM
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Sometimes a round brush is used instead of the crow's foot - mostly on the older homes.
I've painted 100's of houses that had texture on all the ceilings except the bath rms, they had a slick finish. Some don't paint stomp ceilings figuring the paint that is often added to the mix is all it needs. A bath w/shower ceiling must be primed and painted with a latex enamel. Failure to do so will allow the j/c to absorb moisture and the texture will fail sooner or later.
 
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Old 02-19-16, 06:27 PM
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Thanks X and Mark. We don't see that much around here.
 
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Old 02-20-16, 07:26 PM
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The bathroom had a stomped ceiling before, the other bathroom does as well. Its lasted for 38 years with no issues, my parents house from 2001 has stomped ceilings in every room, most houses around here do, Its very common.

At first I didn't care for it, Now I kinda like it. This is in west central Indiana BTW.
 
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Old 02-21-16, 04:41 AM
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It's possible that it was originally painted with oil base enamel as all the better painters in the 70's were still using oil paints in kitchens and bath rms. Oil base primers and paints seal better than latex although a latex primer followed by 1-2 coats of latex enamel should provide adequate protection from the moisture.

While a stomp texture isn't my favorite I like it a LOT better than popcorn!
 
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Old 02-21-16, 02:40 PM
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The thing I don't understand is I was always under the impression that they textured ceilings to save time, but you still have to tape it and get it fairly smooth before texturing no? To me it seems like more work.

I do have friend that has textured ceilings in the bathrooms of a early 2000s double wide and he has had the texture fail in the kids bathroom because they would never turn on the exhaust fan along with his daughter taking showers that drained the 50 gallon water heater. His master bath is ok.
 
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Old 02-21-16, 03:40 PM
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A slick finish ceiling requires a higher level of finishing, the thicker the texture the less finishing the ceiling requires. I remember back when heavy popcorn was popular all they did was tape the seams and one coat of mud over the screws/nails.

Exhaust fans help! but any substrate that can absorb moisture needs to be primed and painted to help it repel moisture. Flat latex paint does very little to help the drywall repel moisture which is why latex enamel is always advised.
 
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