Bathtub Tiling

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Old 02-17-16, 08:16 PM
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Bathtub Tiling

Hi, I have a couple general questions about tiling the wall around my bathtub. The bathroom remodel sticky suggested not posting there, so I'm taking a guess at where this post belongs...

I have experience remodeling all the rooms in my home, but I've never installed a new bathtub. Currently, the walls around the tub are fiberglass. We want to take this out along with the tub and replace with tile to go with the new tub. I will be having help with this but need to generally lead the project. So a couple questions I had...

Do I need to waterproof the cement backer board before putting up the mortar? I've seen conflicting answers. If so, what product do you recommend?

Do you just choose from the same tile that you would use on a floor?

Is there a general distance you need to have between the top of the tile and the ceiling?

Are there alternatives to using the tub drain removal tool? I'm willing to save a few bucks here and there if it doesn't hurt the end product.

Any other suggestions are welcome also. Thanks!
 
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Old 02-18-16, 03:39 AM
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Above the tub, you will need to remove all the existing sheetrock to studs. Replace it with 1/2" concrete backer underlayment. Use alkaline resistant mesh tape and thinset to go over all the seams you create. If you are making a cubby, do the same there. You can apply a product like Red Gard to all the seams, especially in the cubby. Applying it to the entire wall is not necessary. You should install a 6 mil vapor barrier on the studs prior to applying the cbu.

You can use some tile which is designed for wall or floor. Most sizes up to 12 x 12 will work on walls just fine. There are many sizes and styles to choose from. Some tile all the way to the ceiling. Some tile to the 6' mark above the floor of the tub. Just a personal choice.

Using a drain removal tool will save the plumbing below. Not sure what the question is alluding to. You will need to remove the drain and overflow in order to remove the tub.
 
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Old 02-18-16, 07:49 AM
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You should install a 6 mil vapor barrier on the studs prior to applying the cbu.
Larry, is this necessary for a bathroom that is totally interior walls (no outside walls involved)?

Agree with Larry on the removal tool. They're not expensive and you'll have it for life. Makes the job much easier.

Personally I prefer tiles to the ceiling. About 2/3rds of the way up you can break up the tile pattern with an accent tile.
 
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Old 02-18-16, 07:39 PM
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Thanks for the replies.

Larry, you mentioned using thinset for the backboard seams, then mentioned using redgard. However, it looks like these are two different products, right? Would I use the redgard for the seams, then the thinset for the tiles?
 
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Old 02-19-16, 04:27 AM
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Norm, just an added safety SHOULD any moisture eek its way past all the protection you have on the walls. Nothing on the walls is absolutely waterproof.

The seams will need to be tied together with alkaline mesh tape and thinset, just like you would a sheetrock joint. I mentioned RedGard as an added waterproofing, but it is not absolutely necessary. In cubbys, I would use RedGard, since water will tend to sit in that area, and you have so many corners in it. Once you have the seams set, you would come over it all with your bed layer for the tiles.
 
 

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