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Making a vaulted ceiling, but with a wall in the middle to support the roof?

Making a vaulted ceiling, but with a wall in the middle to support the roof?

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Old 03-06-16, 07:03 PM
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Question Making a vaulted ceiling, but with a wall in the middle to support the roof?

I've found lots of articles about making vaulted ceilings but those rooms are always rooms that span from one side of the house to the other. What if you had a wall in the middle?

Here is a simple diagram just to show what i am talking about


So how would a vaulted ceiling be done in only one of those rooms, with the center wall helping to support the roof?
 
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  #2  
Old 03-06-16, 07:36 PM
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There is no way for us to answer that question based on your drawing, and the lack of necessary details.... things that a structural engineer would see if he were there looking at it. My advice would be to call a structural engineer or architect in your area, and get a permit.
 
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Old 03-06-16, 07:55 PM
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I am just wondering what is basically involved in this situation. I know that there is a method that uses rafters and one large beam with strong supports on both side, but what if there is a wall in the center? Would a large beam still be used or would the wall be used instead?
 
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Old 03-06-16, 08:16 PM
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Can't say for sure without knowing the first thing about the construction method used on your home. But on some houses you would put a structural ridge beam in and connect the vaulted rafters and the opposing rafters to the ridge beam with hangers/ties. The rafters on the vaulted side would also be tied to the top plate. When you remove the ceiling joists you have to consider how the roof and walls are going to be able to resist lateral forces. This is what a qualified architect and/or structural engineer would determine. Plus, being in CA, there may be earthquake standards that most of us here aren't familiar with. For instance, they might require continuous strapping every so often to physically tie the rafters together across the ridge... larger width rafters, or some other reinforcement. A ledger on a taller, extended center wall and new vaulted ceiling joists placed in hangers might also be an option that would give you a vaulted ceiling but at a lesser pitch than the rafters.
 
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Old 03-07-16, 09:19 AM
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Roof



This is a non-professional opinion:

I think the roof would have to be re-built with scissor trusses to transfer the roof load to the outside walls.
 
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