Wallpaper removal damage. What to do?

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Old 04-19-16, 02:08 AM
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Wallpaper removal damage. What to do?

Hi guys I'm new here.
I just bought a condo and I'm glad I found this site!
I'll be frequenting this site as I seemed have opened up a can of worms.
Built in 1980 as a apartment, where each unit is connected on its side, this condo has been severely neglected by the last owner for the 15 years he's been here....

This is only one of many repairs I'm trying to do...

Anyways,
So the problem is that the bathrooms had a couple layers of wallpaper, first 3 layers were easy to remove but the very last layer, which probably was put in when they built the place will not come off. I tried scoring, wallpaper remover spray, scraping tool, steamed it without luck so I tore it down to the brown paper.

So far what I found online was to, either seal the paper and joint compound, or just joint compound only, or dig down into the gypsum and seal and joint compound. Also I've read on some other posts here about similar problems to use a oil base sealer and joint compound.

Im leaning towards the oil base seal and joint compound method but I cant find the oil based sealer primer, or guardz sealer anywhere in my town. So I bought the valspar all purpose sealer primer which is water based.
Would this sealer work?
Is there another method?
Can I primer over the old glue? The old glue is fused into the outer layer of the wall.

Thanks!
 
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Old 04-19-16, 02:12 AM
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This is the sealer primer, it's water based and can be used for uncoated drywall porous surface
 
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Old 04-19-16, 03:35 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

It looks like the original wallpaper was hung over bare [unprimed] drywall which makes it basically impossible to remove. I'd sand the wall and apply either an oil base primer or Zinnser's Gardz then skim coat with joint compound when dry.

Gardz is the only water based primer that will work! The moisture in latex primers and j/c have a tendency to cause further damage to the wall by partially dissolving the gypsum and making more areas peel. Prior to the advent of Gardz we always used an oil base primer. These primers both seal the wall preventing moisture damage and lock down any leftover wallpaper paste residue. Latex primers are fine for bare walls or repaired walls but are not suitable for going directly over what you have.
 
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Old 04-19-16, 04:58 AM
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That "last" layer, was it the face of the drywall??? Or did the wallpaper pull it off?
 
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Old 04-19-16, 06:30 AM
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As much as I dislike sheetrock work, you have a real mess and IIWM, I'd either pull down the sheetrock and start over, or put up a layer of 1/4 sheetrock over what you have. Doing the former will let you examine the plumbing and electrical and insulation. If there's no way you can get into that now, then I'd put up a layer of wall liner (essentially a special type of wide, heavy wallpaper) to get by until you have time to do a gut job.
 
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Old 04-19-16, 10:05 AM
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Thanks for the quick input guys!
I'm glad I asked about the primer sealer. I was just about to open it the other day.

I have not experience with demoing the wall and putting in a new one yet* although I will have to do it eventually in my shower/tub room where there's a major mold behind the tiles I put a lid over that room for now as I have so much going on already.

Yes, it seems like they just put wallpaper over the wall directly and didn't apply much if any, skim coat? So the corner and the joint are the only area that have any original wall left.

I will try to find the guardz sealer once again and go with that method for now.

Thanks again
 
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Old 04-19-16, 01:58 PM
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The primer you bought is ok to use once you fix the drywall, just not for what you have right now.
I would think most paint stores [not paint depts] would carry Gardz.
 
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Old 04-19-16, 11:51 PM
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Thanks for the reply, i called around but nobody has Guardz in the area, even though they have other Zinsser products. But apparently there is something called Roman Rx-35 PRO-999, which does the same thing and is stocked at the farthest Home Depot.
Ive read some of the reviews and it seems to work great on torn drywall.
 
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Old 04-20-16, 01:06 AM
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Did you call real paint stores and real hardware stores or did you call Home Depots? (Home Depot is neither.)
 
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Old 04-20-16, 07:46 AM
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You don't have to use Gardz, an oil based sealing primer will suffice.
 
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Old 04-20-16, 08:35 AM
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Ya, I only occasionally use Gardz, mostly use an oil base primer .... which I always seemed to have on hand. Other than Gardz cleaning up with water I don't know that one does a better job than the other.
 
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Old 05-13-16, 03:10 AM
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Some update.

I checked out sherwin williams, HD, Lowes, and Benjamin moore.
They had other Zinsser product but no Gardz.

So I ended up getting the Roman RX35 PRO999 which claimed to do the exact same thing as Gardz, big mistake.

Its a glue like substance and it went on really well and it dried up really well to a tacky surface.

The problem came when i applied wall patch, the moisture from the wall patch basically reactivated the PRO999 and loosened the paper to formed bubbles everywhere on the patch.

Luckly I was able to peel off the paper layer as the PRO999 didnt penetrate into the paper, only sat on top of the first paper layer, and just applied Zinsser Gardz that I just got from Amazon.

Gardz was alot more thinner like water, and it penetrated well into the paper layers, even if bubbles form during application, you can go over the area and work with the brush and the bubbles will eventually get wet enough to stick back to the wall.

Hopefully the wall patch will not bubble this time.
 
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Old 05-22-16, 02:30 AM
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so the gardz did really well solidifying the brown paper wall. No bubbles and it was solid to the gypsum, i couldnt peel the paper like i could with the rx35. So i started applying DAP light weight joint compound to fill in the pitted areas of the entire wall, it turned out very well with minimal bubbles here and there.
Cut out the bubbles once the patch dried up and applied gardz and filled it with the DAP. The wall turned out looking like white washed brown wall.

Everything looked really good... until I started applying ProForm Lite blue with a bigger spatula thing. Bubbles everywhere, this time where the gardz was applied. (not as bad as with the RX35)
I thought I was applying too much of the skim coat at first so I started applying the thinnest coat i can to the other 3 walls, which barely covered anything, but it seems like the moisture from the skim coat has reactivated the gardz coat making the brown paper wet and started bubbling.

What am i doing wrong? is the wall faulty to begin with? I guess oil base was the way to go? and i thought i was being super cautious

Ive seen a tutorial where a lady with the exact same circumstance as me with the torn up wall, mixes water to the skim coat until its almost muddy liquid, but even she didnt have much bubbling issues, and she used the RX35.

was i suppose to thin out the lite blue to a liquid state?

So far i marked all the bubbles i can see and feel with an X so once the skim coat dries i will cut them out again and seal and fill it with DAP. Hopefully there is no catastrophic surprise once everything dries.
 
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Old 05-22-16, 04:11 AM
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It would have been better to use the green lid all purpose mud for the initial coat as it has better adhesive properties but the light weight mud should have done ok. Did you thin the mud any? it flows and applies better if slightly thinned. I don't know why the Gardz would soften up after it has dried ??
 
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Old 05-22-16, 02:35 PM
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Thanks for the reply.

I was up all night till 6am cutting out all the bubbles and it seems like the bubbles were formed deep in the paper or at the gypsum.

The GARDZ did solidify 3-4 layers of brown paper but anything deeper where it was still paper bubbled apparently. Also found some internal cracked area at the gypsum was prone to bubble.

I should of thinned it alittle to make it easier but I ended up muscling through without, made sure it was a really thin coat.

I've bought zinsser 123 plus primer to prime the walls tomorrow and now I'm reluctant to apply it since its waterbase and I'd hate to see the wall bubble up again. Should I go with a Zinsser oil base primer? Or should the 123 plus be ok.
123 plus seems to be the newest and best primer they have and it says it has oil base characteristics.

Thanks again
 
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Old 05-23-16, 03:49 AM
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Generally a latex primer is fine over joint compound although an oil base primer is best IF there are concerns with the latex rewetting the j/c. Normally that is only a concern when painting old unpainted ceiling texture.
 
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Old 08-02-16, 09:05 PM
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So after 4 months with only 1 DIY time a week I was able to get the wall done pretty good, not perfect but good for a first time attempt of a bad wall.
After the GARDZ I skim coated the wall very very lightly and built up the wall until it was somewhat smooth.
I then used Zinsser cover stain oil based primer which was thick as tar, even with adding penetrol. Ended up drying very thick with brush strokes but nice and white and no bubbling. Sanded it somewhat smooth. I cheated and caulked the uneven and cracked corners too. Roll painted a semigloss valspar signature which was able to hide the paint strokes nicely. Removed the overly done popcorn ceiling suprisingly easily, painted it with valspar color changing ceiling paint(probably could of used any type of paint).

Thanks for all the help

Now on the the bigger bathroom that's is a much worse condition...
 
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Old 08-03-16, 04:24 AM
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With bad wallpaper that tears the drywall up I fine it easier and less time consuming to just replace drywall. Tear out and install I find is less time than taking old stuck wallpaper off.
 
 

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