How to hide a sheetrock wall seam ?

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Old 11-27-16, 04:34 PM
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How to hide a sheetrock wall seam ?

I'm replacing a open 3 foot tall and 7 foot long railing with a 3 foot tall and 7 foot long studded wall.

The new wall will attach to an existing 7 1/2 foot tall wall so I will have a 3 foot high vertical seam where the two meet. I want to tastefully cover the seam.

I opted to not break into and tie the new wall to the existing wall and tape and compound the joint out of concern the seam would ultimately show up with seasonal weather changes and normal movement in the house.

Instead I'm considering making a very thin wood wall trim piece to cover the seam and paint it to match the walls.

But before I do this, and since I'm not a pro but a d-i-y guy, I wanted to ask if there are manufactured products that are specifically designed for this kind of update?

Thank you
 
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Old 11-27-16, 04:39 PM
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That logic escapes me. Do you think that's the only place in your house where one sheet meets another? Tape and finish it.

But to answer your question, no... there are no wood products made for that. It almost sounds like you are after a t-moulding. Sounds a little goofy.
 
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Old 11-27-16, 07:46 PM
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Trim/moulding that is thin and wide (maybe 1.5") is called lattice. Any home store has it in wood and vinyl.

I would use hot melt glue rather than nails.
 
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Old 11-28-16, 03:36 AM
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IMO hiding the joint with a thin molding would look tacky. It isn't all that big of a deal to tape the joint and with multiple coats [each wider than the previous] of joint compound make the transition disappear. Humidity changes should affect this joint more than any other drywall joint in your house.
 
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Old 11-28-16, 04:49 AM
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Based on everyone's comments, I'm going to reconsider taping and compounding the seam.

I was careful to line up the new wall and the existing wall so I might be able to make it look seamless.

Does it matter that the existing wall that I attached to is actually the outside corner that has a metal corner strip under the finished drywall?
 
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Old 11-28-16, 04:59 AM
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It would be easier to get a nice looking joint if you remove the corner bead.
 
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Old 11-28-16, 05:37 AM
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It would be easier to get a nice looking joint if you remove the corner bead
That was my original thought and the reason I have been leaning toward a thin wood strip to cover the seam.

This is my daughter's house and I wanted to minimize what I had to do to replace the railing.

I'll try to take a photo of the area we are talking about over the next few days to see if you still think removing the corner bead is necessary.

Thank you for the comments
 
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Old 11-28-16, 05:38 AM
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It can be done with the corner bead left in place but it's easier, maybe quicker to get a nice level joint with the bead removed.
 
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