My first drywall job

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Old 01-07-17, 07:28 PM
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My first drywall job

Well today I completed my first ever drywall job in my basement of the house (1971) I bought a couple years ago. The previous owner built the workbench and I'm going to throw on a plywood top I guess, since it's only individual planks on top with cracks that screws and things can fall through.

Anyways, the bottom half of the wall was done with one sheet of drywall and whoever owned it threw the top half together with scraps and the top and right side had always been exposed and showed pink insulation.

So I decided today that I'd go out and see if I could get a sheet of drywall and have at it! I knew nothing about doing drywall other than you need drywall screws. The guy at HD said he would cut it into 4 pieces for me and did so as I had to get it into the back of my Subaru Forester.

I got home a removed all the scrap drywall off the top and was down to pink insulation and tar paper. In places I had to tack up the corners of the tar paper (what's that for by the way?). Then I located all the studs and cut my drywall that I needed. More than a few screws were off and missed the studs, so I guess I should've maybe drew a line down or something.

Should I bother mudding and taping, etc? Filling in all the screws? I might when I get ambitious in the spring lol! Anways I'm not sure if I did everything correctly, but I'm proud of my first ever "little" drywall job.

Here's the pics. I'm thinking next of adding a pull light for more light in the area and some shelves on the drywall that I just put up. Any recommendations?

Thanks
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Old 01-07-17, 08:04 PM
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I would suggest adding a florescent shop light above the workbench. It looks a little dark, I would have a hard time seeing...lol.

You can get the kind that plugs into a switched outlet, or put the pull chain style light up and get a socket adapter to plug the light into.
 
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Old 01-07-17, 08:26 PM
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Thanks! That was going to be my next question. I've got about 5 pull chain lights and one pretty close to this area. How difficult is it to install a pull chain light myself over the bench and hard wire it? Do I just tie the power into the other light or what? Do I need a permit to install a light?
 
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Old 01-08-17, 04:11 AM
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Adding a receptacle/light would likely require a permit. IMO a 4' florescent would give better lighting than a keyless light.

While your drywall doesn't have to be finished it would be a good place to learn/hone finishing skills.
 
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Old 01-08-17, 05:35 AM
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Like Mark said a good place to practice.Drywall is cheap and if you mess it up pull it off and start over. Taping skill will help you all over the house, fixing cracks to holes, remodeling. I would get a 5 gallon bucket of drywall mud and paper tape You won't use all the mud but last a real long time in storage if you do a simple step. Save plastic that is covering mud in bucket clean sides inside and put a 1/2 inch of water on top of mud. I had some saved over 5 years with no problem.
 
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Old 01-08-17, 06:06 AM
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my 2 cents.

skip the fluorescent light and just spend a few dollars more and get a shop LED, youll save money in the long run by eliminating that change you want to do a few years from now.

also, skip the paper tape and just use mesh, you will only get frustrated with trying to install.

and despite the comments any mud will work, have been using mesh for 25+ years from simple to large jobs, any and all mud types and NEVER had an issue.
 
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Old 01-08-17, 09:04 AM
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Another question. Not that I would have to, but - How do you take down drywall after you mud all the screws?

What happens if you don't get a permit for a light? Can you get one after the fact?
 
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Old 01-08-17, 09:16 AM
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To remove drywall after it's finished you have to destroy it [rip it off the wall] I've seen too many failures with the 'sticky tape' [mesh] to recommend it! If you use sticky tape it's best to cover it with a setting compound like Durabond.

Generally permits after the fact cost double. Since you have an open ceiling it wouldn't be a big deal to have it inspected after installation [nothing to tear out so the inspector can see]
 
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Old 01-08-17, 01:06 PM
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Ok guys thanks for all the input!

I've decided that YES a fluorescent light (but LED) would be better. Now wondering if I should wire up a switch or do they have pull-chain type LED "long" lights?

What about shelves? I'm thinking of just going and getting some of those metal shelf mount brackets, maybe in a couple varying sizes and then just a piece of wood for the shelf.

Thanks again!
 
 

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