cutting into roof rafter

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  #1  
Old 01-23-17, 10:52 AM
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cutting into roof rafter

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these are pipes installed from original home build. As you can see there is about 3/4" of cut into double rafter to fit the piping.

I'm not a builder obviously, but how much of the integrity of the roof would be compromise if i was to cut into the rafter another 1". there are currently two 2x6 side by side. i'm guessing cutting the rafter in general is a no, no.
thanks for any feedback
 
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  #2  
Old 01-23-17, 12:00 PM
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Most modern dimensional lumber are 1 1/2 thick. If about 3/4" has already been cut away if you cut out 1" more you'll cut completely through the first rafter and be making a notch in the second.

Is that fixture located against an exterior wall? If so I would think really hard to come up with a way to mount the new faucet and it's plumbing on an interior wall to avoid freezing.
 
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Old 01-23-17, 12:12 PM
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your description in accurate regarding the cuts. it is on an exterior wall, but the plumbing has been there for 50years and i've never had freezing issues. changing location isn't an option bathroom is only 35sq ft. so what are your thoughts on structural issues if i cut through the 2x6 more? in your opinion would it be better off just to replace the existing valve with the same 3way? i don't like the look but i also don't want to do anything stupid. thanks
 
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Old 01-23-17, 12:38 PM
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I would look for a way to use PEX pipe instead of copper and find a way to route the lines that doesn't require further notching any framing members. I guess if it's held up for 50 years the existing notching isn't a problem, but I wouldn't press my luck by making them deeper.

Although it might look a little funny, you could install the new valve over to the right (or left) in the stud bay while still having the shower head and tub spout in their current locations since PEX could easily be routed through the existing notches. I admit that usually they are all lined up vertically, but it's not a requirement.
 
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Old 01-23-17, 12:43 PM
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i was looking into the pex stuff but the tools are expensive for a one and done job. i may just buy the three way and see if its designed the same as the current valve. i may not have to change the layout at all? maybe this would be and easier fix?
 
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Old 01-23-17, 12:56 PM
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I'd like to see about a foot or two on either side of the present cuts and piping. I suspect that if it has been that way for fifty years it isn't going anywhere.

PEX tools can be rented.
 
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Old 01-23-17, 01:12 PM
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i know home depot doesnt rent them. i'm heading over to lowes now.
thanks
 
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Old 01-23-17, 02:22 PM
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I would leave the jog as is, cut out what ever you need to from the verticle stud (whats left of it) and add a vertical stud on either side of the new valve. Modern single handle rough ins from Delta and Moen are usually mounted on a 2x4 that is placed flat horizontal across the extreme back of the cavity. That gives you the perfect offset for normal applications of tile to the walls.

And insulate the crap out of that area before closing things up.
 
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Old 01-23-17, 05:28 PM
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or put some steel strapping straddling the notches and a couple feet either side. If you do this put some kind of non metallic insulation or separation between the steel and the copper to avoid electrolysis.
 
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Old 01-24-17, 09:07 AM
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thanks for all the input. i think i'm going to stay away from cutting anymore rafters. It looks like the cpvc pipe should be flexible enough to get the valve aligned correctly without having to cut into the rafter.
 
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Old 01-24-17, 09:42 AM
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I repeat what others have said. INSULATE, Insulate, Insulate!
When CPVC freezes it shatters. I learned this the hard way, but at least I discovered it before it thawed. Flood damage averted.
 
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Old 01-24-17, 10:19 AM
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so im assuming the PEX is freeze resistant?

thanks for your input.
 
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Old 01-24-17, 10:58 AM
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Even Copper is susceptible to freezing. Here is a blow out I had on an lead to a hose bib that was in sub-zero weather. Made it through 30 winters without issue and then pop.

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Sometimes you have to work around obstacles to make things work.

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Old 01-24-17, 11:36 AM
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Ok.... i'm trying to make an educated decision here with help from this forum....I realize everone has an opinion on solving my issue. I live in baltimore, an rarely does it freeze here. the current plumbing has been here for 50 years, so I know most likely, i won't have issues with copper pipes.

based on that information, am I ok to use CPVC or PEX on an exterior wall?? (what would you use if you were doing the job) Is one more resistant to cold than the other?
I know the copper will hold up, but that's not really an option for the single valve setup i want to install and rafter issue. i don't want to make additional cuts in the rafter.
 
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Old 01-24-17, 12:03 PM
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I'm not following why copper won't work and the others will?

Do you have a link to your valve?
 
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