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How should I hang this sheetrock to fit this space?

How should I hang this sheetrock to fit this space?


  #1  
Old 03-14-17, 06:33 AM
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How should I hang this sheetrock to fit this space?

I am redoing a wall in my bathroom. At present, I have the following;

8-feet horizontal by about 7'10" vertical.
Left side would be an inside corner. Right side is a butt joint.

OR;
I can cut the remaining old sheetrock outů
8'10" horizontal by 7'10" vertical
Left inside corner, right inside corner, and I can redo the other side of that corner.

Questions;
Which way is better?
Which direction do I hang the sheetrock? (Pretty sure I can get 4x10)
Can/should the tapered end go against inside corners and the floor, or should the panels be cut in half so that butt ends are at all corners?
 
  #2  
Old 03-14-17, 07:08 AM
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You generally want to hang Sheetrock horizontally. Full sheet goes against the ceiling, cut edge down by the baseboard. You would probably have less taping if you used the 10' sheets and went corner to corner. Inside corners are easier to do than butt joints.
 
  #3  
Old 03-14-17, 07:47 AM
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Assuming I go horizontal (thus keeping non-tapered ends at the side corners) with 4x10;

Should I have the tapered ends at the floor and ceiling;

Ceiling
taper-corner
sheet
taper joint
sheet
taper
floor (molding)

Or, should I cut a sheet in half so that the sheets are NOT tapered at the ceiling and floor?;
Ceiling
non-taper-corner
1/2 sheet
taper
sheet
taper
1/2 sheet
floor

Thanks
 
  #4  
Old 03-14-17, 07:56 AM
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I thought I explained that. Full piece (4'x8'10") against the ceiling, cut edge (3'10x8'10") next to the floor.
 
  #5  
Old 03-14-17, 08:04 AM
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Just trying to verify.

Any specific things to do with a tapered edge at the ceiling? Or is normal paper tape and compound sufficient?

Thanks for all the advice.
 
  #6  
Old 03-14-17, 08:13 AM
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No there is nothing special about it. It will just use a little more mud and so it won't dry as fast as the other sides. By the time you have it finished, the entire tapered edge will be filled in.

If you have any gaps around the edges after you have hung the drywall, fill those gaps before you tape, using setting compound. (5, 20, 45 or 90 min Easy Sand bags) Just mix up what you need in a drywall pan.

Use normal paper tape. Thin the joint compound slightly, spread it on both sides the of the wall. Bend your paper tape in half, push it tightly into the corner, then wipe it down tight to the wall using a corner knife or a 3 or 4" knife.

Personally I like to finish one side of a corner at a time. So you might find that works best for you too.
 
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Old 03-14-17, 08:16 AM
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In case X's instructions are not getting through, you put tapered edges together at joints so you have a recess which allows building up the necessary mud without getting proud of the surface. This edge is NOT meant to be an end, like at a corner or next to the ceiling or floor.
 
  #8  
Old 03-14-17, 08:32 AM
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Stickshift,
Your statement seems to contradict what XSleeper said about having a tapered end at the ceiling.

XSleeper,
I cannot even picture how one would finish only one side of a corner at a time.

Am I supposed to;
1) spread compound on one side,
2) fold tape and press into that one side
3) Cure, feather, etc.
4) Repeat on other side?
 
  #9  
Old 03-14-17, 08:33 AM
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Good explanation Stickshift, but I think your last sentence is just going to confuse things.

The only place a tapered edge should NEVER be used is on an OUTSIDE corner. I.E... you would never install metal corner bead on top of a tapered edge.

Tapered edges are used all the time on the top and bottom of walls, in the case of any 8' ceiling. As mentioned, the tapered part just gets filled in with mud until it's flush with the non tapered areas. You are going to be cutting 2" off the bottom edge along the floor so I didn't think the taper there was even worth mentioning.

"Finishing" applies to the coats of mud after you are done taping. Once the tape has been applied to the corner and has been wiped down tight on each side, its the next coats that I like to apply one at a time. I coat one side of the inside corner, and cover up the tape using a 4" knife. I try to lay about 1/8" of mud on top of the tape, and feather it down to nothing on the opposite side of the knife by keeping that side of the knife tight to the wall. Once that is dry, I do the same thing on the opposite side of the corner. Then I repeat this procedure using a 6" knife, wiping down tight with the 6" knife). I then use a sanding pole to sand the entire corner, being careful not to put a groove in the wall with the side of the sanding pad. Then I follow that up with a sanding sponge to clean up the corners. Shine a bright light on the corners and skim coat anything that still looks rough. Then when that is dry, give it a final light sanding.

I do it this way (when I have time) because I just get better results. A professional taper has the tools (a corner box) and the skills to do both sides at the same time. When I try to do both sides at the same time, I usually just make a mess of the corner because my knife messes up what I just did on the other side of the corner. So this method has saved me a lot of swearing and frustration.
 

Last edited by XSleeper; 03-14-17 at 08:49 AM.
  #10  
Old 03-14-17, 08:53 AM
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Much clearer, thank you.

I just hope I'm correct about my ceiling height. I haven't really measured yet.
 
  #11  
Old 03-14-17, 08:54 AM
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OK, we do have a difference of opinion. X does this more than I do so go with his recommendation of where you can put the tapered edge.
 
  #12  
Old 03-14-17, 08:55 AM
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Use normal paper tape
Sorry, I will continue to make the case for beginners to use the self stick mesh tape.

You have enough on your plate taking on the installation, not having to struggle with trying to apply paper tape will greatly increase your chances of a successful job.

And, I will state this is all I ever use, have used any and all types of compounds, have never had a strength issue vs paper tape.

Once you get some experience and want to take on using paper it will be there waiting but it's not something that I will ever do!!
 
  #13  
Old 03-14-17, 09:09 AM
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I'm glad you've had good results with 'sticky' tape but I've seen too many failures over the years to advocate it's use. Unless the mesh tape is covered with a setting compound it's better to use paper tape!
 
  #14  
Old 03-14-17, 10:25 AM
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not having to struggle with trying to apply paper tape will greatly increase your chances of a successful job
I disagree with this in that my opinion is the mesh tape, if not applied with setting compound, lacks strength and makes cracks down the road more likely.
 
  #15  
Old 03-14-17, 01:02 PM
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.... and IMO it's not difficult to get the hang of using paper tape. While I've had a goof or two along the way, the main thing repetition gave me was speed.
 
 

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