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Cons from installing drywall vertically

Cons from installing drywall vertically

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  #1  
Old 01-21-18, 08:08 AM
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Cons from installing drywall vertically

My garage has 10ft walls in height and I need to tear down one of the walls.
The current wall is, as expected, set horizontally - i.e. 4ft+4ft+2ft sheets screwed to the studs.

Since I hate cutting and spackling and I calculated that for that wall - I would be much better off to buy 10ft sheets of drywall and screw them up vertically ....I wonder if you guys see a problem with that.

I have never heard anyone installing drywallvertically and what would be the "consequences " of doing it that way....but to me it seems much simpler to just buy several 10footers and run one seam from top to bottom.

Thanks!
 
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Old 01-21-18, 08:35 AM
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You run off your 4' on center layout quickly when hanging vertically. Shadows on the seams are more obvious because of the way the light shines across them, it looks like railroad ties.

The simple thing is to hang horizontally. Use 54" stretchboard, and put a 1 foot ripper in the middle.
 
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Old 01-21-18, 09:09 AM
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thanks for the good advice.... I never heard of the 54" stretchboards and just googled that....seems like good solution in my case

While looks are not that important for me (this is just a garage so I don't care if seams are visible.... your recommended approach sounds better
 
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Old 01-21-18, 10:31 AM
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Finishing horizontally hung drywall is also easier on your back. I'd hate to finish a joint up/down at every 4'
 
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Old 01-21-18, 10:39 AM
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Drywall in commercial buildings is always hung vertically.
 
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Old 01-21-18, 01:00 PM
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Finishing horizontally hung drywall is also easier on your back. I'd hate to finish a joint up/down at every 4'
Although this is true, most homes with average height ceilings (7 to 8 foot), I have always seen hung vertical (4 x 8 sheets that is).
 
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Old 01-21-18, 03:00 PM
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Horizontal or vertical, what ever is easiest for your application is perfectly acceptable!
 
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Old 01-21-18, 03:18 PM
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Hanging drywall horizontally is required by code in most cases. The large sheets of drywall act as a diagonal wall brace.
If you hang the drywall vertically, you are only bracing 4' of wall and the joints are weak due to sharing only one stud for the screws.
If you hang it horizontally and stagger the joints at the midpoint, you are diagonally bracing about 12 feet of the wall.
 
 

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