supporting a bowed lintel


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Old 01-31-18, 04:30 AM
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supporting a bowed lintel

Hi,

I have a bowed wooden lintel over what was once a wooden-framed window but has been open into to an extansion for over 20 years. the lintel is significantly bowed and I am concerned about its weight bearing capabilities over the next years (with added furniture upstairs etc). - the span between brick support is 6ft. The lintel supports the inner wall of the upstars outside cavity walls which includes a window so its not all brickwork on top but a fair amount is.

I see that I have 4 choices

1 leave it, hope for the best and tell folk not put anything too heavy in the room above (I wont sleep well!)

2 Get a builder in which I really cant afford in money, time and having to move stuff out from the area.during the work.

3.put a wooden ot metal supprt in the middle of beem - this cuts the opening in half wich I dont really want to do.

4. Buy an rsj. support it at either end with acrows and box it in. I recckon 250 would see the whole job done. - this is my prefered solution and easily within my capabilities (which are modest as far as diy is concerned).

I just want to check that option 4 is a reasonable solution and also not breaking any regulations or anything. I doubt it would because it would be safer than just leaving it like it has been over the last 20-30 years.

It would be very helpful to ready your comments please.

thanks
Beany
 
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Old 01-31-18, 05:01 AM
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I'm trying to recap in American speak. So, the header over your opening is sagging under the load. It sounds like you have a brick veneer building and the header is supporting the load of the inner wood wall.

What is an rsj and what is an acrows?
 
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Old 01-31-18, 05:31 AM
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haha...didnt realise it was a us board lol

so... its a brick build 1930s property UK. yes the load is on the inner wall. It used to be a singleglazed window many years ago. The there was an extension built so now ot is the inner wall between dinning room and kitchen. The wooden framed window was removed many years ago. the wooden lintel supported the brickwork and upper flooring and I assume the window frame also acced as support for the lintel. The lintel is now sagging around 1/2inch or so as is the upstairs floor.

RSJ = steel H section acrow = builders props

option 4 would be to support the lintel by adding the second H section steel lintel (or another wooden lintel may suffice) simply by screwing up a builders prop at either end. This would be a safety addition not a replacement of any kind.

It is appealing because I could do it in half an hour and the cost would be 150 or so for the lintel and 40 for each of the props. then I would just board it all up.

edit
I guess if this is a US forum though you guys will not know if it is against any uk building regs.
 
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Old 01-31-18, 06:12 AM
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UK regs would be difficult for us, but over here regs vary by local choice. We have guidelines that cover a wide range of construction but each local authority gets to (for the most part) select what applies locally. My point is we always have to hedge on code requirements.

I'm not an engineer and that is where we would normally suggest for a home owner to get a design that a building official would accept, probably the same where you are.

My choice would be a full "U" channel supported at the ends and bolted to the existing lintel, after jacking of course. I was somewhat involved with a post and beam space that was poorly constructed and the engineers came up with a variety of metal brackets and other supports. The added metal was all painted black and actually looked aesthetically pleasing, as least to me.

Jacking that up will probably be the most difficult part after all of this time, buildings tend to get set in their ways.

Good luck,
Bud
 
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Old 01-31-18, 09:36 AM
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Have you been in the basement, crawl space or area below where the 6ft. opening to see what structure is underneath? I am mainly curious what is underneath supporting the ends of the 6ft. opening as that's where all the load is going. I would be hesitant to install lally (builder) columns inboard of your opening if there is not proper support below the floor to carry the load. If you put them in and there is just floor sheeting underneath you may end up creating a whole new problem.

Basically you have to look at the whole structure top to bottom. Best is if the load can be transferred straight down through solid wood all the way to a proper footing in the ground.
 
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Old 01-31-18, 08:36 PM
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thanks Guys
After your comments I've decided to get an engineer in after all. There are other areas that need looking at too so I may as well get them all done together. At least then I'll know what I end up doing is right.
Cheers
Beany
 
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Old 02-01-18, 04:32 AM
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I think that is a wise decision.
 
 

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