Repairing insecure handrail bracket

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Old 08-25-18, 11:12 PM
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Repairing insecure handrail bracket

i have a handrail that is mounted to a wall, which became loose. I want to fix this, but have a few questions. A few facts:

* The wall is a plaster wall (house was built in 1955)
* The handrail bracket was attached directly to the wall

The work that I saw was that the screw that was attached to the bracket was connected to the wall via a cheap plastic screw-in wall anchor -- much like this one:



. I donít think the original work fastens the bracket against studs. Unfortunately, due to some violent bangs, the plaster around the plastic anchor crumbled, leaving the anchor (and everything else) not securely attached to the wall. A friend of mine suggested me to replace anchor that with the metal anchor--and I found one that can tightly secure the bracket against the wall--using this kind of anchor:



Well, that anchor/toggle looks good, except that these anchors wonít snugly fit in the holes anymore. Now my questions are:

1) can we just repair the plaster (add materials around the holes, basically) then hope that the anchor would be securely attached? Or do I have to drill new holes?

2) can we use the metal toggle to secure the handrail bracket, or do I HAVE to find a stud and screw the bracket against the stud? What does the stair building code say on this matter?

Thanks,
Wirawan
 
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Old 08-26-18, 01:23 AM
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The problem is all those fasteners are not really designed to hold something needing a lot of support like a handrail and eventually the rail will come loose.

Since we dont know what the railing looks like or the attachments is it possible to move the mounting bracket?

You need to get it into a wall stud!
 
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Old 08-26-18, 03:41 AM
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Ya, I'd repair the wall where it got damaged and move the bracket/screw over to where it will hit a stud.
 
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Old 08-26-18, 05:49 PM
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I thin marksr and Marq1 are on the right track. But please put up a picture of the mounting area. I want to help you fix the plaster. Is this an interior wall?
 
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Old 08-27-18, 10:55 AM
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Thanks folks. Some follow up questions:

* Do you suggest specific type of screw to hang the bracket to the wall stud? Another internet article [ https://www.thespruce.com/how-to-ins...ailing-1822569 ] suggests using stainless steel screws (2.5" long). Is wood screw that long sufficient? What size is sufficient to bear the weight? (#8, #10, #12, ...etc).

* Do we need another kind of "anchor" within the wall to support the screw? I notice that the (plaster) wall is kinda crumbly once we drill the pilot hole. It does not look like the screw would last well Is there such an anchor that only provide the support the screw IN the wall, but not having anything BEHIND the wall (as the screw will go to the stud right after penetrating the wall). (Most anchors have something that will expand behind the wall--I am not talking about those.) If you don't mind, please provide pointer to what the product is called (and the picture, if possible). I tried to find this, I did not have luck.

Notes:

* My wall thickness is 1", and I was able to locate the studs and drill the pilot holes into the studs.

* I plan to use this product: (sold at Lowe's) . There are three screws for every bracket, so I think that is good (some brackets only have one screw to the wall/wood support).

* My railing is almost 90 inches, and I am going to use four of the brackets--maybe overkill, but given that I have four support beams at my disposal and that using three would look strange, I'd settle with four.

Any comment on my plan would also be appreciated.
 
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Old 08-27-18, 10:59 AM
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Those are the type of rail brackets I'm familiar with. I usually see them in brass. I think 2.5" screws into the wall would be more than sufficient, doesn't need to be stainless - just not a drywall screw as they are too brittle.
 
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