1940 Unsightly & Damaged Walls HELP!


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Old 10-29-18, 09:39 PM
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1940 Unsightly & Damaged Walls HELP!

My house was built in 1940. The many thick layers of paint in the only bathroom are bumpy and just ugly. I removed the medicine cabinet and storage cabinet to find layer after layer of paint, glue (?), and holes. I think Iím dealing with cement coated thinly with plaster. No apparent lath (canít see it; a young man who knows such things said there is no lath.)

I really just want smooth walls. I thought i could skim coat. Now, Iím not feeling confident thatís my answer. The bottom 40Ē or so is ceramic tile. I am not opposed to removing it, and hanging ship lap. Like I said, I really just want smooth walls.

Help?

 
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Old 10-30-18, 04:50 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

There has to be lath of some sort. I think your house might be of the age where they started using drywall lath. The cement coat is the brown or base coat. Since I don't have actual plaster experience, I'd repair the plaster with a setting compound and then skim coat the walls with joint compound. One of our members, Tightcoat, is a plaster pro so hopefully he'll see this thread and have time to reply.
 
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Old 10-30-18, 11:15 AM
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marksr ia correct. The lath is gypsum, similar in some ways to drywall but made to accept gypsum plaster. The finish is lime based, either Keenes cement and lime or gauging plaster and lime. First scrape off everything that is loose. Fill the deepest areas first. Setting joint compound is the most amateur friendly. Get it all even and straight then give it one more coat and leave it nice and smooth. A coat of regular joint compound for the very last coat will sand more easily than the setting mud. Sand, inspect, fill imperfections and prime, inspect, fill imperfetions, sand prime and paint and the walls will look like new.
 
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Old 11-05-18, 05:12 AM
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Appreciate the info

Is there a pre-mixed product youíd recommend?( I have joint compound.) Use the same tools and method as a skim coat? Saying I am an Amateur is really giving me too much experience!

Thank you!

 
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Old 11-05-18, 05:27 AM
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If using a premixed mud you are best off using the green lid all purpose mud [any brand] I always use Durabond for plaster repairs as it closer resembles plaster. It is very hard to sand which is why TC adviced using regular j/c for the final coat.
 
 

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