Removing built in ironing board


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Old 12-21-19, 12:26 PM
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Removing built in ironing board

The previous owners of my home installed an ironing board into the wall. I am wanting to remove this and replace with drywall. I had a couple of questions.

1. Will I be able to cut the drywall board to size and simply install or will I need to add an intermediate framing stud for the center? I can remove the iron board and take a new pic if needed.

2. The board is built into the home's electric system. I thought installing a receptacle made sense. Would I be able to put a box in and then wire up the receptacle? Any other recommendations for this?
 
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Old 12-21-19, 12:33 PM
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You will likely need to add framing around the entire perimeter in order to have something to screw your drywall to. Yes you can likely wire the existing wire to an outlet, assuming the wire comes up from below. I'd put it as low as possible, or even cut it into the drywall below. If the wire comes from above or from the side it will be too short to move. You would need a junction box to extend it. An outlet up high would probably look really odd.
 
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Old 12-21-19, 02:56 PM
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Kind of a neat feature, why would you remove, granted ironing is not a big thing these days but we still drag it out on occasionally and that is completely out of the way?
 
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Old 12-22-19, 02:49 AM
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If you use a junction box it would need to be exposed as you aren't allowed to bury them behind drywall.
I'd also be inclined to keep it as is. It looks nice.
 
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Old 12-22-19, 07:41 AM
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The functionality of it is nice, but it is impractical. Not to mention the location of it is awful. The hallway you see there is already very narrow. The doors on the left are where my washer/dyer is. The door on the right leads out to the garage. If someone comes in when that is out, it will be yanked out of the wall.

I want to mount a small coat rack and other decorations on that wall. I do intend to potentially relocate that piece to my master closet. It makes more sense there.

If you use a junction box it would need to be exposed as you aren't allowed to bury them behind drywall.
Could you elaborate?

I will take the unit out and post pics for information on what is needed for the framing element.

Thanks everyone.
 
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Old 12-22-19, 07:45 AM
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Let's say the wire comes from above but you want to put the outlet 14" from the floor. You need more wire. Because the wire only extends down to 60" above the floor. So you put in a junction box up high to splice and extend the wires. That junction box cannot be buried in the wall... (Covered by drywall) It must be left exposed with a blank cover.
 
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Old 12-22-19, 08:14 AM
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One way to get around a covered junction box would be to install a light.
Then use that box as the junction to run down to the receptacle.

A motion sensing LED fixture might come in handy here is entering the house when it is dark from the garage.

Just a thought.
 
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Old 12-22-19, 09:42 PM
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Good thoughts all. But I have never seen a builtin ironing board in a house so new it has drywall. Not that it didn't happen but you might be dealing with lath of some kind and plaster. Not a problem to replace with drywall, actually, just frame properly to accommodate the difference in thickness between drywall and lath and plaster. If this is indeed the case make sure you keep the drywall shy a bit from flush. More later if needed after you put in a new picture. New thought: even if you have drywall keep the new shy of flush by <1/8"It's easier to fill the patch to make if flush than to spread mud over the existing wall to give the illusion of flat.
 
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Old 12-23-19, 04:27 AM
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I've painted a lot of new construction homes that had built in ironing boards - all drywall. The style of casing shown in the pic makes me think the house isn't old enough to have plaster/lath ..... of course it could be an older home that was remodeled.
 
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Old 12-23-19, 07:04 AM
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If you use a junction box it would need to be exposed as you aren't allowed to bury them behind drywall. Could you elaborate?
The junction box cannot be hidden inside the wall as has been mentioned. One solution would be a junction box flush to the finished wall closed with a blank cover.
 
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Old 12-23-19, 09:00 AM
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Maybe they are coming back and I didn't know it. And the board in the picture does look pretty modern.
Here is another thought. Take out the ironing board and keep the cabinet. It would make a good place for canned goods or something. Or even store a portable ironing board there, Or a skeleton.
 
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Old 12-23-19, 10:38 AM
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I like the idea to turn it into a cabinet providing the hidden ironing board isn't earmarked to be used in a different location.
 
 

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