Garage Ceiling Paneling Not Drywall

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Old 01-09-20, 05:11 PM
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Garage Ceiling Paneling Not Drywall

I just put up faced batt insulation for my garage ceiling, joists on 16 inch centers.

I am seeking advice on ceiling finishing material not having the weight of drywall (1) questionable whether the joists will support that plus some stored materials up above and (2) don't want to wrestle the drywall ovehead and onto the ceiling.
 
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Old 01-09-20, 08:11 PM
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Drywall is typically used because of its fire rating. They make drywall lifts that make ceilings a snap.
 
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Old 01-10-20, 03:42 AM
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..... and anything lighter than drywall isn't likely to be stiff enough to keep from sagging between ceiling joists.
 
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Old 01-10-20, 05:08 AM
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It depends whether or not your garage is attached to the house or if it's a free standing building. If it's a free standing building in most areas you can do whatever you want. Paneling will sag over time but you could use something like OSB or plywood, heavy but lighter than sheetrock.

If the garage is attached to your house then a flammable material like paneling or plywood is not permitted. Sheetrock or some other approved fire resistant material is required by code for fire protection. 1/2" sheetrock is OK in some areas while some locations require 5/8", both must have taped and mudded seams.

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Just as an odd side note. Hardie board, while fire proof, is not permitted to be used. It will not burn but it will transmit the heat of a fire. The gypsum in sheetrock contains a lot of water at the molecular level. When heated the water in the gypsum is released which cools the board and protects objects on the other side from the heat of fire very well. Pretty cool for such a inexpensive product.
 
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Old 01-10-20, 06:26 AM
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I don't believe paneling is a good choice for all the reasons mentioned. Better choices include OSB, plywood and lightweight drywall. An alternative question may be how much weight can the joists in your garage support? To answer that, provide the area of the garage and the size and spacing of joists. Also, what was in the ceiling when you started?
 
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Old 01-10-20, 11:28 AM
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"Just as an odd side note. Hardie board, while fire proof, is not permitted to be used. It will not burn but it will transmit the heat of a fire."
I did not know this. This is important information.

I did know the molecular reason why gypsum is fireproof. If it gets hot enough it is only fireproof once. The glass fibers in fire rated drywall may hold it together in a fire but it will lose the rest of it's structural integrity, as will gypsum plaster.

It is not so much about not burning as it is to give people time to get out.

Years ago a slogan of one of the gypsum companies was, "When seconds are precious lath and plaster gives extra minutes."
 
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Old 01-10-20, 02:09 PM
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Originally open 2x6 ceiling joists, 16" centers. Twenty four foot span with (probably; I forget) 2x8 lying flat perpendicular and tying the joists together horizontally, level, across the middle.. Vertical 2x4 in the middle going up to the ridge (peaked roof) on every fourth joist. Interior of garage just under 24' x 24', clear, no columns.

Attached garage, came with drywall on the side against the main house, open studs on the other walls which I covered with drywall (R-13 batts inside).
 
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Old 01-10-20, 09:37 PM
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I'm not an engineer, but it seems clear to me that 2X6 spaced 16" over a span of 24' is designed only as a frame and not to support much weight. That being the case, I suggest you look at styrofoam or vinyl ceiling tiles. Many can be glued or stapled and come in 2'X4' sizes. They are very light which will make them easy to install.
 
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Old 01-14-20, 11:05 AM
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I will look into the 2'x4' lightweight tiles. Just the right size to span 3 joist bays each.

Thanks.
 
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