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Help for a pot rack on our apartment's kitchen wall

Help for a pot rack on our apartment's kitchen wall


  #1  
Old 10-17-22, 03:11 PM
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Help for a pot rack on our apartment's kitchen wall

I'd like to put this pot rack on our wall, can I just get anchors for the type of wall and for the correct weight? We've used it for over ten years on all kinds of walls that in some cases in our rental apartments were like old cardboard. This thing always stayed up. But this is our own apartment now that we've bought and I'd like to ask what the proper way is. In the past, as I said, I just went with the type of wall it was and the right weight in the anchors. There is a stud but not in a useful place. I think this wall is just plaster with some sort space in between. The total weight of the rack and all pans that will go on it (no pots) is 35lb. Maximum. And that's leaving room for an extra 5-7 lbs of pans that won't even fit anyway.

Wall portion:



Pot rack:

 

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10-18-22, 05:44 AM
Wirepuller38
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Install nicely finished horizontal boards attached to studs. Then attach the rack to the boards.
 
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Old 10-17-22, 03:40 PM
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I'd suggest you just get 3 toggle bolts and position it wherever you want it. Judging by the size of those holes you might need fender washers to go with them.
 
  #3  
Old 10-17-22, 05:25 PM
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What I don't understand then is why does EVERY high quality brand of plastic anchor that can flex to the inside of a wall claim it works fine for hollow walls?
 
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Old 10-17-22, 06:40 PM
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Not sure I understand.
There are dozens of plastic wall anchors. They all work fine in a hollow wall.
They are not all the same. They cannot all hold the same weight.

Are you going to risk that unit coming down by using "plastic" wall anchors ?
Do you have a specific one in mind you want us to comment on ?

When you use a wall fastener there are two things you need to keep in mind.... sheer point and pull out.
If you hang a lot of weight away from the wall.... you need a fastener that spreads the weight out so it doesn't pull thru the wall. Toggles are one of the wider types of fasteners. Whether you use toggle bolts or plastic togglers.

If the two holes in that rack are 16" apart then fastening directly to two studs would be superior.
 
  #5  
Old 10-17-22, 07:24 PM
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The holes are 16" apart but I don't have two studs 16" apart on that wall. 1940s construction, not everything always lines up perfectly.
 
  #6  
Old 10-17-22, 09:50 PM
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Do you know the wall is plaster? Do you know if it is plaster over wood lath or gypsum lath? Or is it drywall/.
A weight near the wall will need a less robust anchor than the same weight cantilevered away from the wall. If the wall is indeed plaster and if it on wood lath and if you hit the meat of thge middle of the lath maybe screws into the wood lath will hold, and maybe not, and you don’t know if you hit the middle of the lath or jut the edge. If you hit between the lath you know it and it won’t hold.
 
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Old 10-18-22, 05:44 AM
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Install nicely finished horizontal boards attached to studs. Then attach the rack to the boards.
 
2john02458, cwbuff, Mikedel voted this post useful.
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Old 10-18-22, 11:18 AM
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"What I don't understand then is why does EVERY high quality brand of plastic anchor that can flex to the inside of a wall claim it works fine for hollow walls?"
It's sales and marketing. It is also why big box stores sell many "easy" options. They want your money. They don't care so much if the project is done properly. You would not buy those plastic, easy to use anchors if they said it's only good for light duty like hanging a picture.
---
Option 1: I would drill new holes in your pot rack to coincide with joist locations within your wall. I think at best you'll only get two to hit a stud.

Option 2: As already mentioned, install nice looking boards to the wall then attach your pot shelf to them.

Option 3: Cut open the wall. Install wood blocking where needed. Repair the sheetrock, paint and hang your shelf.

Option 4: Use toggle bolts as mentioned. They require a large hole in the wall so make sure your shelf will conceal the holes.

Option 5: Buy a different shelf bracket now that you know where your studs are located, pick one that will work.
 
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Old 10-19-22, 05:35 AM
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I don't appear to have a stud where I need one on this short wall for where the rack can go. To be honest, I don't trust the stud finder I have because it's been wrong in the past and I don't want to end up with a swiss cheese wall digging around for one. I have yet to see a reliable device for finding studs or joists that doesn't cost exorbitant amounts of money.
And before you ask, there isn't another wall in the kitchen on which it can be installed. And quite frankly we're sick of having lived in the last two places where it was impossible to install because of lack of wall space. I think it'll have to be toggles. I will have to go get longer screws though because the one I just drilled a hole for wasn't long enough to get into the empty space for the wings to open up. I'll probably try the plastic snap toggles instead, they seem easier to deal with.
 
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Old 10-19-22, 08:57 AM
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What is your wall construction? It must be more than sheetrock if the toggle bolt is too short. Most sheetrock is only 1/2" thick. Either you have a super short bolt or a thick wall, possibly lath and plaster?

If you put much of any weight on that shelf metal toggle bolts really are a better choice than most of the plastic gizmos.

How hard was it to drill the hole? Sheetrock drills super easy. You can twist a screwdriver by hand and bore a hole. But, if it's plaster of some type it is much harder, almost like a weak cement, and you may have hit wire or wood lathe. If it's lathe and plaster it can be a good thing as the wall could support more weight.
 
  #11  
Old 10-19-22, 11:35 AM
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A 1940s house might be lath and plaster either over wood lath or gypsum lath. Both wood lath and gypsum lath are 48” long so the spacing of 16”OC works out. I could be metal lath but this is rare in residential construction, at least in the States. But a house of that vintage could be drywall. Plaster will hold more than drywall.
Every option I can think of has been laid out. Choose the one you think is best and Please Let Us Know what you chose and how it works.
 
 

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