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Attaching furring strips for drywall to brick

Attaching furring strips for drywall to brick


  #1  
Old 04-14-24, 11:53 AM
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Attaching furring strips for drywall to brick/block

My house (1950) is double brick construction combined with brick on block and I need to attach some furring strips for drywall to the brick. I was going to use tapcon screws and pre-drill the holes (hammer drill for the brick). I am wondering if that is overkill. I saw a video where a guy used masonry nails but that was on cinder block. What is the easiest way to attach the furring strips?

The nails the guy in the video used looked like a cleat you use for hardwood flooring. The existing furring strips (1950) looks like they used regular nails and they pull out easily.

I saw someone else use heavy duty construction adhesive and nails using a ram set.

This is what the wall looks like:
 
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Old 04-14-24, 02:12 PM
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Tapcons would work.
A ram set would be much easier and quicker.
 
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Old 04-14-24, 04:00 PM
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Okay. Thanks. Is there a size/length of tapcon you'd recommend?

I have a related question but I think it is probably better to put it in another post.
 
  #4  
Old 04-14-24, 04:07 PM
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Replacing double drywall - little insulation

I am remodeling a kitchen in a house built in 1950. The outside masonry walls have 3/4" furring strips that the drywall were attached to and then 1" of drywall (3/8+5/8).

The furring strips can be pulled out of the wall with my hand as they used small nails. Some broke. There was very little insulation as the cavity was 3/4". Each strip has a ton of nails sticking out that would need to be removed (that is how they attached the old drywall).

My options:
1) Reinforce the furring strips with tapcons, remove the nails and add 2 sheets of drywall totalling 1".
2) Change out the furring strips attaching new ones secured by tapcons and add 2 sheets of drywall.
3) Add 1 1/4" wood strips and use 1/2" drywall. This would allow for more insulation, more strength to attach upper cabinets and not dealing with double drywall. My father suggested ripping down a 2x4 on my table saw to get 1 1/4 strips.

The ending depth of the drywall+lumber needs to be 1 3/4" so I don't have to fool with moving electrical boxes, heating vents, doors and windows.

The drywall work will be contracted out.

 
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Old 04-14-24, 04:33 PM
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What you use for furring is not critical.
Be sure to consider something solid for mounting upper cabinets to,

I've you are asking my opinion..... I'd be using 2x3's or 2x4's on the flat with single sheetrock.
It's important to have room for electrical boxes.
I'd be using shallow 4" square boxes with mud rings.
 
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  #6  
Old 04-14-24, 04:47 PM
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I like the idea of new 1 1/4" furring strips. If you start right, perhaps you won't have to remove the existing strips, Oh, forget that if you are going to add insulation. I own a powder actuated tool and could use that to put up the strips. I think I might opt for Tapcons. I would have to put a pencil to it for materials. Shots vs. Screws. What is your time worth?
A reason for 1 1/4 strips is you can use normal 1 1/4" drywall screws. Some of them would bottom out on the masonry if you use 3/4" strips. You can get more insulation as you suggest.
And it sounds like it will be easier to remove the existing strips and start over than to pull the nails.
 
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Old 04-15-24, 07:07 AM
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Thanks for the responses. I think I am going to go with 1 1/4 strips. Is there fiberglass insulation that thin or do I need to just use 1" rigid insulation??
 
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Old 04-15-24, 07:43 AM
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Id be using 2x2 and 1 1/2" insulation. I think the furring strips and brick may explode if you try to use a powder fastener.
 
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Old 04-15-24, 08:31 AM
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If I use 1 1/2 wood aren't I going to have problems with my doors and windows? The framing around those will be recessed 1/4 inch. The electrical boxes also won't be flush. Those might be able to be handled with a mud ring.
 
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Old 04-15-24, 10:42 AM
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I like PJmax' idea of 2X4s or 3s on the flat. I like big targets to screw to.
 
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Old 04-15-24, 12:08 PM
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Nothing a little trim won't fix.
 
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Old 04-17-24, 03:30 PM
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I went with the 2x4s placed the opposite of a normal stud wall. I used 3 1/4" long 1/4" tapcons. I predrilled the holes in the wood and countersunk them so the heads wouldn't affect drywall installation. Most of the 2x4s don't budge. Some are loose. I've found that the brick holds way better than the block because the block is hollow. The problem is the walls are mostly block.

Any suggestions to strengthen up the studs that are looser? Some I added more screws but that doesn't always do it. I was thinking of cross bracing to the next stud, but that will only do so much. I thought about trying some masonry nails.
 
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Old 04-17-24, 05:12 PM
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Caulk both sides with pl polyurethane.
 
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  #14  
Old 04-17-24, 05:41 PM
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Good idea on the construction adhesive. I know once the drywall is screwed down this will form a system so I think that will do it.

Applying it to the back before screwing them in probably would have been a good idea. Would have made the drilling easier too as holding them plumb and drilling wasn't that easy.
 

Last edited by michaeljc70; 04-17-24 at 06:49 PM.
  #15  
Old 04-18-24, 06:35 AM
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In some places the exterior wall is not flush due to messy masonry work and the wood headers over windows/doors not being flush with the masonry. How concerned do I need to be about this? I could use a thinner board (1x4) and shim it in these areas but that will be a lot of work. I know drywall has some give to it so I don't want to do more work than I need to.
 
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Old 04-19-24, 09:56 AM
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If by messy work you mean gobs of mortar that squoze out when the bricks and blocks were laid maybe you can knock them off with a chisel. If the masonry is not straight find the highest point and plumb and straighten from that. Rather than mess around with different thicknesses of studs I would put shims behind the low places when I screwed the studs. And look for higher spots. that is where the stud is tighter to the wall for screwing points. If there is a lot of difference between the highs and lows then you might need longer screws. Or countersink the screws a little deeper.
 
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Old 04-19-24, 11:05 AM
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Thanks. I've started shimming. It isn't going to be perfect, but I am trying to fix the worst areas. I'm guessing some of these 2x4s aren't the straightest either.
 
 

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