Complying With National Plumbing Code

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-09-16, 09:58 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 10
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Complying With National Plumbing Code

I'm going to replace the old copper tubing going to my water heater. I live in a township that must comply with county plumbing codes. The county I live in follows the National Plumbing code with no additions or variations to the code. I have two questions. Number one, does anyone know whether or not Sharkbite connectors comply with the National Plumbing Code and/or whether they are allowed? I've used Sharkbite connectors before and I've never had one leak or fail. I've already soldered copper tubing to the two dielectric unions that will attach to the inlet and outlet water connections on the existing water heater but I haven't installed them yet. I've never had a problem with leaks from any copper tubing I've soldered but I want to use Sharkbite fittings elsewhere for ease of disassembly if necessary. I may or may not use the soldered dielectric unions. I've done a lot of research for this project and I've read many horror stories concerning the dielectric unions leaking or failing after a few months. I may just go with using copper/brass connections threaded directly to the inlet and outlet nipples, either copper/brass that I will solder to the copper tubing or the 3/4 brass female ends of Sharkbite braided steel flexible connectors, which leads to my second question. Does anyone know whether or not these Sharkbite 3/4 and 1/2 connectors comply with the National Plumbing Code? I assume that they do as they are always displayed next to water heaters in the stores. I've learned that some jurisdictions don't allow flexible connectors unless they offer "full flow". I believe that these Sharkbite flexible connectors do allow full flow but I'm not certain.

I will replace my 45 year old Rheem 40 gallon water heater with a Rheem Performance Platinum 50 gallon Short 12 Year 40,000 BTU ENERGY STAR Natural Gas Water Heater Model # 204321571 sometime next year. I will be replacing the magnesium anode rod in the new Rheem water heater with an aluminum/zinc anode rod before installing it as I have very bad well water. I don't expect to get 45 years out of the new Rheem water heater. I do not need to pull a permit and have an inspection when I replace the copper water lines. However, I will have to pull a permit and be subject to an inspection for the installation of the new water heater next year. I don't want to fail a water heater installation inspection because of non-allowable connections to the water heater itself. I could probably install the new water heater without pulling the permit and get away with it because I had a new furnace and AC unit installed two years ago and there would be no need to replace anything else in the basement in the next twenty or thirty years that would require a permit and an inspection but I'm not going to go there. Codes are in place for safety reasons and I will not attempt to bypass or subvert them. Besides, the permit is only $30.00 and I'm allowed to pull the permit and install the water heater myself since I'm the homeowner.

Thank you in advance for your time and any assistance provided.
 
  #2  
Old 11-09-16, 10:18 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,429
Received 287 Votes on 257 Posts
Q: What standards and codes do SharkBite fittings comply?
A: SharkBite fittings are certified to ASSE 1061, NSF/ANSI 61, NSF/ANSI 14 and NSF/ANSI 372. They are listed by IAPMO and CSA. SharkBite fittings are compliant with the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC), National Plumbing Code of Canada and the International Plumbing Code (IPC). Since local code varies by area, please consult with local plumbing codes for specific applications.


Above lifted from SharkBite Fittings FAQs: Products & Applications
 
  #3  
Old 11-09-16, 11:36 AM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,450
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Generally a water heater is installed with a ball valve above on the incoming cold supply.
It shouldn't matter if the valve is soldered or push-on.
I would leave as long of a stub out as possible coming out of the wall and install the integrated valve and flex line.
Leaving a longer stub out will allow you to convert to hard pipe, but I really doubt that will be necessary or required by the inspector.
I would be more concerned with gravity draining the relief valve to the outside if required.
 
  #4  
Old 11-09-16, 12:14 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 10
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you very much, Norm, for your prompt reply. I appreciate it very much.
 
  #5  
Old 11-09-16, 12:28 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 10
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you, Handyone, for your prompt reply. I really appreciate it.

Actually, the stubs will come from above the water heater as the water lines are mounted to the joists in the basement. I already have the 1/2 and 3/4 Sharkbite braided steel flexible hoses with the valves attached. I'm going to use a valve on the hot water outlet also, although it's not necessary. I'm using the flexible hoses because the current copper tubing configuration above the water heater includes two 45 degree angles. I could sweat them or use copper compression fittings but again, I want to be able to easily disconnect the fittings.
 
  #6  
Old 11-09-16, 12:37 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,429
Received 287 Votes on 257 Posts
A valve on the outlet is not allowed by code if my information is corret. It's possible to have an over pressure situation.

That being said I have done this but I also have large warning tag to never shut off this valve without shutting down burner.
 

Last edited by Norm201; 11-09-16 at 12:54 PM.
  #7  
Old 11-09-16, 02:24 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 10
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks again, Norm. I've been doing a lot of research on the plumbing code as it applies to water heaters and I couldn't find anything that would disallow a shutoff valve on the hot water outlet but perhaps I missed it. I was researching the International Plumbing Code, Chapter 5, which Ohio has adopted as a state code. The only code I could find that would prohibit a valve on the hot water outlet was the Chicago code, which expressly forbids it. I can understand the theory of not putting a valve on the hot water outlet as it pertains to over pressurization and/or explosion factors but I would think that the water heater's thermostat and/or the TPR valve would protect against that. I'll just buy a Sharkbite 1/2 in. braided steel hose without the valve and have it on hand in case the inspector disallows the hot water outlet valve. It wouldn't take more than five or ten minutes to swap them. If I don't need it I'll simply return it for a refund. I simply want a valve on the hot water outlet for convenience when it comes to flushing the tank a couple of times a year and any future new hot water heater installations.

I'm also installing an AMTROL ST-5 Thermal Expansion Tank on the cold water inlet line.
 
  #8  
Old 11-09-16, 02:33 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,429
Received 287 Votes on 257 Posts
I simply want a valve on the hot water outlet for convenience when it comes to flushing the tank a couple of times a year and any future new hot water heater installations.
Yes, that's exactly why I have it also. Don't need to drain all the water lines in house just to do a quick maintenance.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: