Air in hot water line.

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Old 12-15-16, 07:11 AM
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Air in hot water line.

Moved to Apache Junction Arizona last June. Bought a house built in the 60's. It is on city water. It has two Whirlpool Energysmart electric water heaters. One is in the laundry room and services the laundry room, the kitchen, and one bathroom. No problem with this water heater. The other is located in a closet outside the other end of the house and services a bathroom. If I turn on the water in the bathroom air comes out of the faucet after a few seconds and then clears up after a few more seconds. My gut tells me the water heater is generating air. What are your thoughts on a cause and solution.
 
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Old 12-16-16, 07:24 AM
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My guess is the hot water pickup tube has a hole(s) near the top of the tank and the tank has a volume of air above the water line. When a valve is opened, air will mix with the flowing water in the pickup tube until the air pressure drops to the water pressure. I would think eventually the tank would have all water and no air. I don't see this condition as harmful as many faucets have an aerator that mixes air with water at the spout. If you can get an diagram or exploded view of your water heater, you may be able to remove the hot water pickup tube and repair/replace. Good luck.
 
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Old 12-16-16, 04:35 PM
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This explanation has been given in several different places and discussion boards.

As the anode rod sacrifices itself to prolong the life of the tank, hydrogen gas is given off. This gas collects in the tank (at the top) and goes out the hot pipe to the faucets.

Do not remove the anode rod to stop this gas formation. After the anode rod is fully sacrificed, the tank itself will corrode and produce the same hydrogen gas.

Alternatively, does the faucet in question have a long decorative gooseneck? This might drain out between uses and, upon the next use, air gushes out as the gooseneck gets filled with water again.
 
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