Water heater in closet: leaking plumbing


  #1  
Old 02-18-17, 05:40 PM
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Water heater in closet: leaking plumbing

Our water heater is in an external closet, what I mean is it's one of those that is accessible from the outside. It's a place I've never thought of checking. Once in a while I do open it to see lots of spider webs, then I close it. LOL!

Anyway, the water heater in there is 15 years old. It's still working, but we figure to get a head of the curve and replace it. At first, I was thinking of doing it myself with the help of a buddy. But upon examining the closet, I'm worried about some things I see.

Here's a picture of what the current situation looks like from the top of the heater. I labeled them A and B so you know which one I'm referring too.

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My concern is that Water A line isn't going to be a simple connection. Looks like cutting and soldering would be involved at this point. However, in my case, I think the whole line should be replaced. I remove the foam and I see all this corrosion and build up. That whole line should be replaced, right? Do we cut a part of the dry wall out to get to the fitting?

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Old 02-19-17, 05:15 AM
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Do you have access to behind the wall? If replacing the pipes you would need such access. The green is cupric oxide. Around the water heater connection it comes from a slight leak and not having dielectric nipples in the water heater. I know it is gas, but you have two different metals touching and that isn't good.


You've got a job ahead of you since your electrical system is grounded to the water pipe, and can't be moved. You will be stuck with using copper pipe. Cutting the copper back to clear pipe behind the wall and starting over is a good choice, but may be above your pay grade. If you feel comfortable with soldering, then you are good to go. THe wall can be repaired.
 
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Old 02-19-17, 05:18 AM
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The staining on the wall and corrosion on the pipe makes me think it is or has been wet. Are those areas wet or does it appear to be old damage?
 
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Old 02-19-17, 06:57 AM
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Also need to lose that old gate valve and replace with a brass ball valve.
Gate valves almost always leak at some point and not fully shut off over time.
Just a guess, when you do open up that wall you'll find someplace that copper pipe was connected to steel causing all that corrosion, it looks so corroded it's been leaking and spraying up the wall causing the water stains.
Anyway it all needs to come out.
 
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Old 02-19-17, 12:48 PM
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Chandler, when you ask if I have access behind the wall... Do you mean if I have access to the main fittings if I cut out the dry wall? Or, do you mean if I have access from my garage/bddroom? The closet is basically in my garage, but it's walled off. Adjacent to the water turn off knob is a bedroom. The only access is from the side walkway outside the house. So we'll need to do the cutting inside the closet once water heater is removed. The main connections should be there, right?

Well, I'm definitely going to let a Pro do this, but I just wanna understand more when I communicate with them.
 
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Old 02-19-17, 02:42 PM
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The wall where the pipes are at is probably the best one to remove and replace . You may be ahead of the game money wise to go ahead and remove a 2' square of the sheetrock to allow whoever does the repair to have full immediate access. Plumbers don't do sheetrock, so it will be out of their way. It will also give you a heads up as to what is needed.
 
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Old 02-19-17, 05:47 PM
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Okay, now for the gas line. Do you guys think the whole thing has to go too? Should I cut the wall down here too in advance for a pro?

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Old 02-19-17, 05:58 PM
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No, the gas line seems to be intact with no abrasions. Giving the guy a total view of both the water plumbing and the gas line won't be detrimental and could save a few bucks by having it done ahead of time. Make that a bargaining point
 
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Old 02-20-17, 07:11 AM
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Gas line was not plumbed correctly.
Your missing the drip leg.
Look at page 6.
http://www.statewaterheaters.com/lit...184115-000.pdf
 
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Old 02-20-17, 12:53 PM
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What's a drip leg? I think the link/manual you provided is not using the same term because I can't find it.
 
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Old 02-20-17, 12:56 PM
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Oh, you mean the sediment trap? Isn't that a new code? I'm sure the plumber will install that, but I'll remind him.
 
 

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