Please recommend an energy efficient elec water heater

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Old 09-19-17, 07:23 PM
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Please recommend an energy efficient elec water heater

I currently have a Sears Power Miser 12, this heater is 10 years old and I'm contemplating replacing it.

I did neglect it, been 8 years since I drained it. My elec bills have been creeping up and i suspect the lower element could have sediment around it.

Based on its age, should I just go with a new one for peace of mind?

Trying to stay around $500 but can sway a little.

We have 4 people and think a 50 gal should still be adequate. Looking for the most energy efficient heater as possible.....wi-fi would be great but could be cost-prohibitive.

I'm open to all criticism and input.
 
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Old 09-19-17, 08:20 PM
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ALL electric water heaters are inherently energy efficient. The conversion rate is between 95 and 98 percent efficiency. The installation is the key. All electric water heaters need to be set on an insulating (Styrofoam) pad, all need to have the hot outlet piping fully insulated and the cold inlet piping insulated from the tank back to the source about 24 inches. The safety valve should be insulated in a manner that does NOT interfere with the test handle. If the heater is installed in a garage or other area where heat lost from the tank itself is simply lost then an additional insulation blanket may be added although the return on investment may be as long as the life of the tank itself.

My personal preference is to always install an 80 gallon electric water heater. This will allow for minimal hot water usage even during power outages. I have gone three days including Navy showers without power but still having hot water. Since you are only heating water used the operating costs of the larger heater are only very slightly more than a smaller tank and almost no chance of ever running out of hot water.

As for your rising power bills, I don't know who you have for a power utility but the rates have been rising over the last few years and that alone may be the cause. Changing outside lighting to the newer LED bulbs saves me even over the CFL bulbs I previously used. LEDs inside also offer significant savings in operating costs. Turn off lights when you leave the room.
 
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Old 09-19-17, 08:32 PM
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In many areas electric water heaters cost two to three times as much to operate as natural gas.
 
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Old 09-19-17, 08:42 PM
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I have thought about going larger in size, but figured a 60 or even an 80 gal tank would be considerably more to heat....but if its marginal then it's worth considering.

MY poco has been steady with the rates the last few years....but the bill has crept up the last 4 to 6 months or so.

I do need to address the install issue....my heater is sitting on a thin piece of cardboard on the slab. Whatever I do next....I definitely want to wrap it....maybe even with some Miraflex or similar to really insulate it well, including the top.
 
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Old 09-20-17, 12:31 AM
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Water heating costs will be higher in the winter for the simple reason that the incoming water is colder. Increased usage of air conditioning during summer will cause you to use more power. If your power rate is $0.15 per kilo-watthour then an additional ten hours of a standard 100 watt bulb will use fifteen cents of power. Two hours a day of that bulb would equal ninety cents a month. Even having kids using a video game on the television might increase the power consumption noticeably.
 
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Old 10-04-17, 09:24 AM
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If I were going to install an electric water heater today I believe that considering the electric rates I would install a Rheem Marathon. They are initially more expensive, but are super insulated and have a lifetime warranty.
 
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Old 04-03-18, 03:44 AM
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If it's been 10 years, I'd drain off 4 or 5 gallons of water in a white bucket and let it settle to evaluate the amount of sediment it may or may not contain, and then see "IF" that may have contributed to your rising electric costs.

Although it's unrelated, have you considered replacing the sacrificial Anode Rod to extend the life of the current Hot Water Heater; maybe doubling it . . . . depending upon the pH of the incoming water supply.
 
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Old 04-03-18, 06:40 AM
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I'd appreciate hearing about Furd's comment on using an insulation pad. My understanding has been that today's water heaters are well insulated and have been for around 20 years.

i6pwr, I'm in the process of getting a new electric water heater, as well. (Mine's leaking slightly.) I chose an A. O. Smith 50 gallon, available at Lowes for $600. It's 95% efficient, has a first hour rating of 81 gallons, and comes with a 12 year warranty.

Having said that, I agree with Vermont's comment on the anode rod.
 
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