Time to replace my gas hot water heater?

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Old 04-02-18, 06:58 PM
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Time to replace my gas hot water heater?

Hi we have a hot water heater that's roughly 9 years old. The whole thing tilts about 4 degrees. In the last photo you'll see the black pipe is 90 degrees and the Bradford White label is about 86 degrees. There is some crust leaking out of that side thingy and corrosion on the one pipe that goes into the system. There doesn't appear to be any water dripping from the system or around it on the floor.

Is it time to replace it? Is it going to blow?

Thanks.
 
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Old 04-02-18, 08:21 PM
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That device on the side with the handle is the T&P (temperature and pressure) relief valve. It's not leaking. The water from the top leak is getting into the insulation and spreading inside the case of the water heater.

That looks like some type of copper to CPVC coupler. I don't remember seeing one that big before. That needs to be replaced.

Will the tank blow...... doubtful. The water leaking into the tank is not helping matters. As far as the leaning.... make sure the bottom is not rusting thru and allowing the unit to lean. Nine years is an ok run for a water heater.
 
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Old 04-03-18, 05:10 AM
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Originally Posted by PJmax View Post
That device on the side with the handle is the T&P (temperature and pressure) relief valve. It's not leaking. The water from the top leak is getting into the insulation and spreading inside the case of the water heater.

That looks like some type of copper to CPVC coupler. I don't remember seeing one that big before. That needs to be replaced.

Will the tank blow...... doubtful. The water leaking into the tank is not helping matters. As far as the leaning.... make sure the bottom is not rusting thru and allowing the unit to lean. Nine years is an ok run for a water heater.
Thanks so much for your input!
 
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Old 04-03-18, 08:35 AM
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My 2 would be to clean it up as Pete advised and then start putting a couple bucks away here and there so you're ready when it does fail but I would not replace it at the moment.
 
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Old 04-03-18, 02:20 PM
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A 9-year-old water heater shouldn't need to be replaced. However, your pix show general indications of poor maintenance of your plumbing systems. That leaking fitting on the top of the water heater has been badly leaking for years. And I see Type NM electrical cable (Romex) just draped in midair. Also, there appear to be lamp cords routed here and there. I wonder what other problems exist?
 
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Old 04-03-18, 03:05 PM
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Does it look like Carpet's Gas HWH has a replaceable Anode Rod ?
 
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Old 04-03-18, 05:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike Speed 30 View Post
A 9-year-old water heater shouldn't need to be replaced. However, your pix show general indications of poor maintenance of your plumbing systems. That leaking fitting on the top of the water heater has been badly leaking for years. And I see Type NM electrical cable (Romex) just draped in midair. Also, there appear to be lamp cords routed here and there. I wonder what other problems exist?
Thanks for the feedback. Going to just replace everything including the leaking pipes above. Don't want to risk it.
 
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Old 04-03-18, 06:17 PM
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I can't see an anode rod, but I assume there is one. But removing a rod is quite difficult, at least for me. My city water is softened at the plant and I just forget about replacing the rod. My last water heater was 60+ years old, and working fine, when I replaced it out of an abundance of caution.

I do think that draining a couple of gallons out of the tank on a regular basis is a good idea. Looking at the O.P.'s other lack of maintenance, I doubt that has been done.
 
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Old 04-04-18, 05:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Mike Speed 30 View Post
I can't see an anode rod, but I assume there is one. But removing a rod is quite difficult, at least for me. My city water is softened at the plant and I just forget about replacing the rod. My last water heater was 60+ years old, and working fine, when I replaced it out of an abundance of caution.

I do think that draining a couple of gallons out of the tank on a regular basis is a good idea. Looking at the O.P.'s other lack of maintenance, I doubt that has been done.
We've lived in this house for two years and are finding out that the people who were here before us did not maintain it too well. We're slowly fixing it up here and there.
 
 

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