Flexible lines to water heater


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Old 01-15-19, 07:18 AM
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Flexible lines to water heater

Replacing an electric water heater that has 3/4 Genova plastic lines now. Can I use the stainless flexible lines and connect to old Genova plastic? Need to move the new heater a few inches so it will no longer line up with old supply line locations. Plus I need to add in an expansion tank.

Also, should I add a shut off the the output line?
 
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Old 01-15-19, 07:26 AM
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Sure, you would just need to cut the pipe up by the elbows and add the right adapter.

Adding a shutoff to the output would give you another place to shut hot water off, if needed, but it would be redundant if the supply is shut off, as you won't have any pressure once it's turned off. The hot side shutoff would prevent all the water from draining out if you ever had to remove the braided connections in the future, which might be a plus.

You have to be quite careful when tightening pvc to metal fittings. Don't over tighten and use thead sealant on threads.
 
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Old 01-15-19, 08:28 AM
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Make sure the flexible lines are rated for hot water. I wasn't paying attention when I bought the ones to hook up my water heater and had to take one back to get one that was rated for hot water. [doesn't matter on the inlet side]
 
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Old 01-16-19, 08:42 AM
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Can I use the stainless flexible lines and connect to old Genova plastic?

Shouldn't be a problem, but there might be another problem. I have never been a fan of CPVC water lines and have been told many years ago that when you alter the system by cutting in a new fitting/valve and glue it that the glue must set a pretty long time before you can put water pressure on it. Maybe as long as 12 to 24 hours. If this is wrong, please someone say so.
 
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Old 01-16-19, 08:51 AM
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My house has a lot of CPVC. If I use the all purpose glue the can states 2-4 hrs cure time but if I use the CPVC glue it states 24 hrs. I've never had any issues with either adding new or repairing old using the instructions on the can ...... but I'm just a painter and would never consider myself a plumber [just too cheap to hire one]
 
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Old 01-17-19, 05:53 AM
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What if you use PVC cement on the CPVC pipe and fittings, how long would you have to wait to put pressure on the system?
 
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Old 01-17-19, 06:09 AM
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I've never tried that. There are 3 basic types of glue, PVC only, CPVC only and the all purpose glue. The all purpose and PVC glue are both clear but I assume there is some basic difference. The CPVC only glue is orange.
 
 

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