Vacuum Breaker


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Old 11-17-19, 07:51 PM
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Vacuum Breaker

Does a vacuum breaker on a water heater have to be vertically above the inlet of a top feed water heater or can it be inline on the supply line. Most pic I've seen have the supply line go into a T with the vacuum breaker coming in from the top, and the H20 heater connection connecting from the bottom. I'd prefer to put it inline so I can use a flex copper line to make the connection to the tank as I won't have the exact location of the new H20 heater inlet.
 
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Old 11-19-19, 05:30 PM
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I have never heard of a vacuum breaker on a water heater installation before. Got any pictures?
 
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Old 11-19-19, 09:26 PM
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Just quick google examples....there out there, but I've never seen one either. My niece in San Antonio said her plumber said they are code.

IAPMO

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/inter...ffc4aa70d.jpeg

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32297423680.html
 
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Old 11-19-19, 11:49 PM
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ZA-15 Vacuum Relief Valve should be installed at the highest point of the cold water inlet
I have one on my chlorine storage tank, as long as it's above the tank, in theory it would open in the event that the water drained away before the level dropped into the tank and collapsed it!
 
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Old 11-20-19, 08:11 AM
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Just quick google examples....there out there, but I've never seen one either. My niece in San Antonio said her plumber said they are code.

Ok, I've now heard of it, but still have never seen one.

If the water heater is installed above fixtures, there is a possibility of siphonage from the water heater. If the water supply is turned off or pressure drops as fixtures are being used, there is a possibility of a siphon being created because of the fixture water supply opening being lower than the tank. This could result in the tank emptying and possible steam being created in the tank. There have been instances where this siphonic action has been so powerful as to collapse the tank. For these reasons, a vacuum relief valve must be installed
I suppose if a water heater was installed in an attic one would be required.
 
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Old 11-20-19, 08:29 AM
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I suppose if a water heater was installed in an attic one would be required.
Remember, you have a fixture at the bottom of the tank (the drain)!
 
 

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