Picking the ideal water softener!


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Old 08-06-16, 10:39 PM
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Picking the ideal water softener!

Hello everyone,
I have never had a water softener before, but my home I purchased 2 years ago is creating a lot of build up in bathrooms, dishes, etc so I'm looking to make my first purchase. I've been researching for a couple of weeks and can't seem to figure out what the logical purchase is.

My first thought was the Aquasana "salt free" system because I can get the 1,000,000 gallon filtration tank, and 600k softener tank all for around 1600 bucks (didn't factor in shipping, installation, taxes, etc).
My research concludes though that salt free softeners are not ideal.
they will not necessarily reduce water spots on dishes, improve soap
usage, etc. Mainly they will help with the build ups in piping. Is this
true? opinions on the Aquasana system? It seems to be very highly
rated by user reviews.

Then I turned to traditional salt softeners, but there is so much information and some of it contradictory. I don't know what I need.

I live in Algonquin IL - link to 2015 water quality report
http://www.algonquin.org/egov/docume...6368_80945.pdf

and water hardness levels based on this site
Algonquin IL water quality report and Algonquin drinking water info

my water hardness in the area ranges from 17-28 GPG. I tested my water using a freebie color tester from Menards and this seems accurate. Is this range good enough to purchase a water softener, or do I need to be much more specific (like, exactly 22 GPG).

I checked my water utilities from 2014 onwards. My most ridiculous month of usage was in November 2014 when I had a lot of out of town family, water usage spiked to around 40,000 gallons!!! next highest month was 16,000 gallons. all other months range pretty consistently between 8,000-10,000.

if I use 10,000 gallons - I am getting a daily usage of about 333 gallons. Is it smart to "play it safe" and round this up to 400?

if I say 400 gallons daily use, and mid range hardness of 22 GPG = 8800 grains per day to remove.

Iron range is pretty broad, but mid range of that is around .12 ppm. is this enough to even consider a factor??

8800x7 days which seems to be the recommended recharge cycle = 61,000 grains.

soooo... - am I safe in assuming that "any" 60,000 ish water softener will work well for my usage?

how much salt usage is typical and expected for a system that would work well for me? there are so many options to consider with salt water softeners, and tons of advertising around efficiency, but I can't figure out how much of it is marketing BS and how much is true savings. Only thing i know for certain, is that I would want a metered softener. beyond that, I am pretty clueless.

this is the one I am considering though: any thoughts?
Genesis Upflow High Efficiency - Genesis Softeners - On Demand Softeners - Water Softeners - Water Softeners, Softner Parts, Water Filtration

thank you for any and all contributions
 
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Old 08-07-16, 06:56 AM
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You are on the right track. The formula for sizing is # people x 65 (avg daily gallons) x hardness x 7 days. Lets say you are needing 61000 grains a week. This will mean you need a 90,000. This is because resin is more efficient when less salt is used. 1 CF of resin will yield 30,000 grain @ 15 lbs salt or 20,000 grains @ 6 lbs salt. So a 90k unit using 6 lbs of salt will yield 60K. 60,000/65/4 people/22 hardness=10.48 days between regen. 30/10.48/18 lbs of salt per regen (6 lbs per CF) or 51.52 lbs of salt per month.
 
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Old 08-07-16, 10:42 AM
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Thanks for simplifying the math and breaking it down. The CF and efficiency is where I was getting lost bad news is I need a 90k which is more expensive lol.

Thoughts on my guesstimates? I'm using the middle range of 22 gpg for my area. Will there be a drastic difference in cost savings, water softness, etc if I get an exact value for my specific home?

Any preferred reasonably priced brands? Kinetico and the like are not budget friendly although probably worth the cost. Cheap big box ones don't appear to do everything I want on an efficient way. There are way too many options, and seemingly biased reviews
 
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Old 08-08-16, 06:07 AM
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You do have to use a 90k system. You can use a 2 CF or 60k unit. Your capacity would be 40,000/65/4/22=6.9 days between regen. The smaller system will regen a little more but will still work fine. Clack and Fleck make very good systems.
 
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Old 08-08-16, 01:06 PM
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Appreciate the help biermech. Guess I'll do a bit of number crunching and see if the larger system might be a better long term solution. Might also help in the event that we have people staying over which tends to happen every few months
 
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Old 08-08-16, 02:20 PM
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Best thing to start is buy a Hach 5B test kit. This way you can test the water hardness at your house and not rely on a semi or annual report. Clack makes a very good valve as does Fleck. I've leaned towards Clack over the past 4 years.
 
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Old 08-26-16, 02:26 AM
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hope youre still around biermech

finally púlled the trigger and settled on genesis premiere 80k grain unit from the site i linked above. but after spending about 1300 im having second thoughts.

went to menards and saw the waterboss systems. they advertise a few models with significantly lower salt and water usage... can you please explain why there is such a huge difference in specifications?

one unit is listed at 22k gpg. 2.5 lbs salt and around 15g water...

if i got this unit... it seems to me i would end up regenerating about 11 times a month, but still use lower amts of salt and water???

so i can save on front cost, and long term salt/water costs...

the only downside is i would have to fill up salt every month which isnt so bad.

what am i missing???????
 
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Old 08-26-16, 03:07 PM
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You get better efficiency with up flow brining than with down flow. The down side is greater chance of hardness bleed through. Also, using fine mesh resin will increase the capacity in a smaller tank. You can pack more beads. Downside is fine mesh has a shorter life span. IIRC
 
 

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