To salt free or to Not salt free?


  #1  
Old 07-10-23, 07:09 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 37
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
To salt free or to Not salt free?

I live in the western suburbs of Chicago and get treated city well water (wish it was Lake Michigan water...).

We have quite a bit of that white-ish sediment on our faucets and at the base of showers/tubs. And I'm told by the neighbors our water is soft.

I'm considering a whole house softener / filter, and saw this Evo system, but a friend of mine said his friend who's a plumber said to NOT get salt free.

Does anyone know why he would say that? I don't care if the water isn't super soft, as I also read that that can make it feel like you cannot rinse soap out if the water is too soft.

Any experience with this system and if I'm not concerned with over softening the water but rather mildly easing up on the hardness, is this a good system? Or otherwise any other recommendations that are very little/low maintenance and small footprint?

Thanks in advance!!
 
  #2  
Old 07-11-23, 12:44 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 9,745
Received 1,210 Upvotes on 1,098 Posts
I'm told by the neighbors our water is soft.
You can't determine what you need until you know what you have, you must get your water tested to know!

Here is a good article about the systems, conventional salt systems use ion exchange to remove the hard water ions that cause water to be hard, the non-salt systems sort of cover it up.

Also, you can't over-soften water, your removing calcium and magnesium ions in the water so it's just a matter of how much is removed.

https://www.freshwatersystems.com/bl...ater-softeners
 
ddeshpan voted this post useful.
  #3  
Old 07-11-23, 04:47 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 27,932
Received 2,218 Upvotes on 1,980 Posts
It sounds like you are on municipal water. Visit your water providers website or contact them for a water report. Then once you know what's in the water you can make an informed decision instead of just guessing.
 
ddeshpan voted this post useful.
  #4  
Old 07-11-23, 02:08 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 37
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks all. All good points. Sounds like the consensus is to test / ask my city what the water report is. I can do so.

Assuming I can get that, and in very very laymen's terms, it's very "hard" water. Would the system I had originally linked be a good one considering my main priorities here would be:

1) I don't want to feel like I have to perpetually rinse soap/shampoo etc out (like it's not coming out of my hair/skin)
2) Reduce (or eliminate, but at least reduce) the white-ish sediment
3) Low -> No Maintenance

I think this one might be pretty expensive, but open to ideas here. Once I have the report, I can share that here too.

Thank you all so much for your help thus far!

https://www.evowatersystems.com/prod...6-78eec7251ef7
 
  #5  
Old 07-11-23, 03:50 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 9,745
Received 1,210 Upvotes on 1,098 Posts
I don't want to feel like I have to perpetually rinse soap/shampoo etc out (like it's not coming out of my hair/skin)
That's not a problem it's just the result of having soft water and I guarantee in a short amount of time you wont even notice, until the day comes that you have a batch of hard water and wonder why it feels so "hard"!
 
  #6  
Old 07-12-23, 07:15 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 37
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Got it. Thanks for the input.

From my city's water quality report for 2022-2023:
Water Hardness: Our wells have high a concentration of hardness minerals. For the settings on water softeners the wells have total GRAINS of 15 or 256 Mg/L

Any thoughts or recommendations? I like the one I had linked originally mainly because it gets good reviews and looks to be very low maintenance while not sacrificing flow.
https://www.evowatersystems.com/prod...6-78eec7251ef7

Thanks so much!
 
  #7  
Old 07-12-23, 08:10 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 9,745
Received 1,210 Upvotes on 1,098 Posts
180 mg/l is considered very hard water and would require a pretty big conventional water softener, as noted no experience with the no-salt systems so I'd be doing some serious homework before spending money on something that is questionable to begin with.
 
  #8  
Old 07-12-23, 09:32 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 37
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Ah so 256 mg/L is significantly hard water, huh? Thank you for that baseline.

Does anyone on here have experience with the system I had linked and / or salt free softeners in general considering 256 mg/L?

https://www.evowatersystems.com/prod...6-78eec7251ef7
 
  #9  
Old 07-12-23, 10:18 AM
Z
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,124
Received 425 Upvotes on 378 Posts
I've always learned that the salt-free softeners aren't worthwhile. I wouldn't quite call them a scam on par with those 'magnetic water filters', but as I understand it they don't take the hardness out of the water, they just make the water seem less hard.

If you do have hard water as it sounds, I would rather spend my money on a proper salt softener to remove the hardness.

I'd also get some water hardness test strips too. You'll need it for the softener install, since regeneration is based on the actual water hardness and the size of the softener.


Just my couple cents of recommendation
 
Marq1 voted this post useful.
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: