Band Saw- Brazing Solder 40-50% plus

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-01-16, 06:58 AM
biketrax's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 389
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Band Saw- Brazing Solder 40-50% plus

I realize that you need the higher silver solder content for this specific (steel) purpose. I am trying to figure out if any of the older solder (unlabeled) I have is a higher % than the lower 10%-15% copper/pipe solder? Is there any proven method of figuring out the silver content ?? For this soldering purpose.
PS can the lower content silver solder work on these steel blade with any success?
thanks
 
  #2  
Old 10-01-16, 07:07 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 61,482
Received 1,421 Votes on 1,314 Posts
I doubt any plumbing solder will work to splice a steel blade. Anything containing lead or antimony doesn't have the strength needed.

Band saw blades are normally spot tack welded.

I was looking around and there are specific silver allows that can be used.
One is called Braze 505
Silver alloys such as N50 or Easy-Flo 3 are available but contain cadmium which makes their fumes toxic and are a health risk.
 
  #3  
Old 10-03-16, 11:54 AM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 10,181
Received 49 Votes on 46 Posts
"Silver solder" is an often misused term.
Most referring to silver solder acually mean silver brazing which is done at a higher temperature than solder.

Having said this there is low silver content solder that has somewhat more strength than soft solder and more importantly does not tarnish with age.
Unfortunately it would not be good for saw blades.

High temperature silver brazing is used to attach carbide teeth to saw blades.
 
  #4  
Old 10-03-16, 12:08 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 24,752
Received 791 Votes on 728 Posts
I've never seen a band saw blade soldered or brazed. The machine that makes up the blades and when purchasing them ready made both weld the steel. The machine holds both ends of the blade in the proper position and hits them with the current to weld the ends together. Then you grind the weld area smooth.
 
  #5  
Old 10-03-16, 05:18 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 4,864
Received 88 Votes on 81 Posts
As mentioned over and over, never going to happen, there spot welded, annealed, then ground.
 
  #6  
Old 10-04-16, 06:30 AM
G
Member
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: MI
Posts: 2,634
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Guys back in the more self-reliant "good ole days" it was common to fix the blade yourself by brazing. Just another mostly-lost talent, along with filing & setting your own saw teeth.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: