copper pipe solder


  #1  
Old 01-01-19, 02:25 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 265
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
copper pipe solder

I was practicing soldering on copper pipe. I was using decent solder but the flux I bought on ebay was chinese stuff. I dont know if that was the problem. It was cheap. I was comparing my joints to existing joints that were neat and were wiped clean..an even covering of solder at least a quarter inch out from the joint and no gaps. smooth.
My joints looked a lot different. I only got one that showed that smooth flow but my joints tested ok for leaks although I didnt use pressure.I put plenty of solder

in and parts looked good but not all the way around.I think there was enough solder in the joint but it just didnt look smooth and professional.Some of them I wiped more flux on and tried to make them look better but that just melts the good parts too.

Is appearance that important?
And is it ok to go back over them with more wire??
 
  #2  
Old 01-01-19, 02:45 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 70,175
Received 2,978 Votes on 2,686 Posts
The key to a good, tight, clean job is that everything must be clean. The copper must be shiny. If you have flux that is questionable.... toss it. Flux is cheap and all the home improvement stores carry it. Get a fresh can and a pack of cheap flux brushes. You can wipe the joint clean after soldering with a wet rag but be careful to not disturb the joint.
 
  #3  
Old 01-01-19, 03:54 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 9,510
Received 953 Votes on 865 Posts
but the flux I bought on ebay was chinese stuff
OMG, bought from China?

Throw all of it away, go to local hardware store and buy new solder, new flux, and a big box of emery cloth.

Clean the pipes and fittings, all surfaces till they shine but do not touch, coat all surfaces with light coating of flux, use a MAP torch to evenly heat the pipe and fitting (if it turns blue that is too much concentrated heat).

Run the solder around the joint and you are done, very simple!

CLEAN, CLEAN, and good materials!
 
  #4  
Old 01-01-19, 07:42 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 11,422
Received 595 Votes on 532 Posts
I agree with the previous post. But in my opinion looks concerning soldered pipes means absolutely nothing. Will they hold the pressure and not leak is all that counts. In my early days of soldering, my joints looked bad, lots of over solder. But they never leaked. Now days I make them look professional. And they don't leak.
 
  #5  
Old 01-02-19, 10:47 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 265
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
my torch puts out a blue pinpoint flame. I will get a map gas set up sometime.That might help.
 
  #6  
Old 01-02-19, 03:35 PM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 9,029
Received 76 Votes on 69 Posts
With a small flame like that you are not getting the pipe hot enough to have the solder flow.
 
  #7  
Old 01-02-19, 03:51 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 11,422
Received 595 Votes on 532 Posts
This is the proper flame of a propane torch for heating copper up to about 1" pipe joints
 
Attached Images   
  #8  
Old 01-15-19, 01:38 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: usa
Posts: 40
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
(assuming all is clean, shiny, and fluxed) the solder will flow towards the hottest point, so you can 'draw' it into a joint. The joint is made INSIDE the fitting...what you see is of little importance. Take one apart and observe the 'tinning' between the pieces, that will tell you if you are getting it hot enough and pulling the solder in. Too hot is bad...and always polish both surfaces...then put the flux on to keep air away. (oxidizes)
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: