sump pump installation

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  #1  
Old 09-18-16, 12:01 PM
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sump pump installation

I installed a sump pump in my basement. I looked online for tips, and talked to friends about how to do this.

Now, after getting it all put together, I have a question about the work that I did.

I placed the sump pump on a 12" x 12" x 2" paver inside the tub. I guess that's supposed to help protect the sump pump from getting clogged up.

Is it really necessary to set the sump pump on top of a paver ?? I'm now thinking that if I set the sump pump on the bottom of the tub, that would lower the water level by 2 more inches.

What do you think ??
 

Last edited by skooterbum11; 09-18-16 at 12:01 PM. Reason: spelling errors
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Old 09-18-16, 12:17 PM
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the main reason we put them up on pavers is so they dont run as much. you dont want the sump pump to run 24/7.

you might have a high water table where there is ALWAYS going to be water in the tub. you will never get rid of all that water. unless theres a drought. so you would want it to go off when it gets higher than that. say it rains a lot and the water table rises. thats when you want it to run.

if the sump pit is dry we will put the pump right on the bottom

if you did put the paver in just so its clogged then you could just make sure theres no debris on the bottom and put a lid on it and you should be good without the paver
 
  #3  
Old 09-19-16, 07:40 AM
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When the sump pump starts, it should keep running until the pit is nearly empty.

Sometimes it is desirable to set the pump an inch above the pit bottom (and leave the last inch of water behind) to keep sand and debris from being sucked up to increase wear on the pump.

Sometimes the pump is raised because the (vertical) range or distance from pump turn on level to pump turn off level cannot be made great enough (inherently poor pump design).

Right now I am thinkiing that the best pump turn on level is when the lowest drain pipe dumping into the pit is half submerged. This gives a good portion of run time when additional water queued up in the drain pipes is draining into the pit which in turn increases the total amount of water removed in each pump cycle. (If the drain pipes are allowed to get fully submerged there is an increased chance that the far side or corner of the basement floor could get flooded.)

If the water table during certain weeks of the year is such that the level in the pit is quite high and steady but not high enough to start the pump then it can stay that way without being pumped out.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 09-19-16 at 08:28 AM.
  #4  
Old 09-19-16, 12:02 PM
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I installed the pump due to wet basement problems when it rains. There are no drain pipes running into the pit. It's just rain water seeping through the dirt and into my basement that I'm trying to remove.

It hasn't rained for 3 or 4 days now, and I just checked the water level in the pit. I have 8" of standing water inside the tub. Also, I put a layer of at least 2" of pea gravel under the tub. So realistically I have 10" of standing water in the pit.

When I dug the pit, I had 1" or 2" of standing water when the weather was dry.

I'm leaning towards removing the paver to help eliminate some of the standing water, in hopes of helping eliminate the water coming into my basement.

Please advise if you agree with this choice.

Your replies to this post seem to support this idea, but I'm a worry wort. I like to get as much verification as I can.

Thanks for your time !!

Ron
 
  #5  
Old 09-19-16, 05:17 PM
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Depending on the porosity of the soil or sand under the entire basement floor, one pit in the corner may protect only up to a radius of few feet of basement floor around the pit from flooding. Perimeter drain pipes or tiles (or additional pits with pumps) are needed to collect the water from all around the basement and protect those parts of the floor also.

The fact you have 10 inches of standing water including in the 2 inches of gravel below the basin bottom does not make any difference compared with 8 inches of standing water above the basin bottom if you leave the 2 inches of water below the basin bottom behind when the pump stops.

The primary advantage by far of removing the paver and pumping 2 more inches of water out is that there is more pit space for incoming water and therefore more time (in minutes or even hours) before the pump has to start yet another cycle. Sump pumps last longer if they don't have to restart as often.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 09-19-16 at 05:48 PM.
 

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