Splitting the well for two locations?

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-15-17, 09:53 AM
O
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: usa
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Splitting the well for two locations?

Hi,

I know this has been asked before, but my situation is a little different. I have a summer business and we are in the process of setting up a double wide next to the business building and sharing the well. The well is approx. 150' from building. About 60'deep w/ black plastic buried line to business. Line runs in the business building to check valve then big gray holding tank to smaller blue pressure tank which has pressure control switch attached and has breaker in this building, then feeds the water to the whole building. I need to split where water comes in the building under ground with a tee, have a shut off for the summer business building for winterizing. Then come off the tee with black plastic lined to other side off business building to double wide home. Any way to make this work so during summer they both have water and during winter just the new double wide home? During the summer when opened, I doubt the double wide would use water because the people working the business will live in the home. and use the business restrooms. With the invention of the microchip this has to be easy as comparison lol.
Thanks in advance,
ozoner
 
  #2  
Old 09-15-17, 10:33 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 61,440
Received 1,409 Votes on 1,304 Posts
Welcome to the forums.

You currently have a submersible well feeding a commercial building. Power is in that building as well as the pressure tank and pressure switch. If you winterize that equipment.... IE: no water in building - what will control the pump ?
 
  #3  
Old 09-15-17, 12:34 PM
O
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: usa
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'm thinking for winter to run power for pump from double wide if possible. I'm almost wondering if my best option is to run water off business to double wide for summer and switch everything over to double wide for winter. Was hoping for a miracle option lol.

ozoner
 
  #4  
Old 09-15-17, 12:42 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 61,440
Received 1,409 Votes on 1,304 Posts
I don't know the setup you have there but moving tanks when the season changes doesn't sound like an effective solution.

If you were to ask me my opinion.... I would create a "well" room within the building to contain the equipment. The room wouldn't have to be very big. Adding only as much heat as needed to keep the system from freezing. Winterize the rest of the building. Take the supply for the double wide from the same "well" room.
 
  #5  
Old 09-15-17, 01:00 PM
O
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: usa
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi Pete,

Thank you for the welcome and the response. I wouldn't move the tanks, just add a pressure tank and switch to double wide for winter time. Thought of heating water area in concession stand, but inlet is in one area and then through a wall and then straight line to check valve and tanks....etc. Would be a lot to heat and would need to insulate and put in heating system, Was just hoping somebody had a similar situation and wiring solution maybe a switch to control the pump simultaneously from each location,

Thanks again,

ozoner
 
  #6  
Old 09-16-17, 07:47 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 4,352
Received 116 Votes on 107 Posts
Install a pressure tank and the pump switches before the tee where the main building and double wide lines split. This will start and stop the pump correctly regardless of which building or both are using water. (Simplified -- Put tee and then ball valves after the existing pressure tank and drain for winter only what is downstream, no pump or tank changes needed.) Everything upstream of tee must be heated.

No pressure switches on the far (downstream) side of ball valves that cut off either building. You don't want a switch on the far side ever calling for water when the ball valve is shut.

The other pressure tanks can remain in place. Or you can take one, move it permanently to be before the tee, and put nothing where it used to be.

Note:: The big gray holding tank will not empty out much (or at all) before the blue pressure tank next to it (and the pressure tank installed per the first paragraph here) empty out and lose enough pressure to turn the pump on again. That is, unless the big gray holding tank is itself pre-pressurized in the same manner as the pressure tank next to it.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 09-16-17 at 08:22 AM.
  #7  
Old 09-16-17, 10:02 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 61,440
Received 1,409 Votes on 1,304 Posts
I need to split where water comes in the building under ground with a tee,
Allan....not sure you read the OP. The line will be Tee'd underground. Where would you put what you are describing ?
 
  #8  
Old 09-17-17, 05:37 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 4,352
Received 116 Votes on 107 Posts
How about this:
Tee off to the double wide mobile home type building as you planned. Put a pressure switch set and a pressure tank in the double wide.
No ball valve between that and the tee and the pump.
The double wide plumbing remains active all the time and its pressure switch is treated as the primary pressure switch.
Optionally, keep the pressure switch in the main building active but wire it up so both pressure switches have to call for water before the pump comes on. When either switch reaches turn off pressure then the pump shuts off.

You might find that the system performs better if the turn on pressure setting is a bit higher than it used to be. In any event, the pressure tank in the other building will lengthen the time before the pump comes back on compared with having just the pressure tank in the building where water is being used.

If you absolutely need the possibility of isolating both buildings' pressure tanks and pressure switches from the pump then find some way of putting a pressure switch upstream to act as an upper limit safety cutoff.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 09-17-17 at 06:07 AM.
  #9  
Old 09-17-17, 09:55 AM
O
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: usa
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you Allen,

This is what I thought might work. How do I wire the two control switches to work simultaneously? The power wire runs from the well to breaker to pressure switch in concession building. Right now the concession building pressure switch controls the well pump. Is there a devise that can enable me to run power to both locations switches simultaneously from the concession buildings breaker, or should I just wire in a switch to power one location or the other? Since the people living in the home work the snack bar, water will only be needed at one location at a time. A switch might make the most sense. And remember 6 months out of the year the concession building has no water or pressure switch in use, but does have the breaker wired to the pump and pressure switch.

Thanks again,

ozoner
 
  #10  
Old 09-17-17, 07:00 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 4,352
Received 116 Votes on 107 Posts
Run two new wires, preferably red and black, (or a 2 wire cable) from the new pressure switch in the double wide over to the original pressure switch in the concession building. At the original pressure switch, remove one wire (not a white wire) from one terminal and connect it to one of the new wires. Connect the other new wire to the switch terminal that was vacated.
 
  #11  
Old 09-17-17, 07:09 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 61,440
Received 1,409 Votes on 1,304 Posts
Optionally, keep the pressure switch in the main building active but wire it up so both pressure switches have to call for water before the pump comes on. When either switch reaches turn off pressure then the pump shuts off.
If there is no water in the building.... how can that pressure switch work?
 
  #12  
Old 09-18-17, 07:39 AM
O
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: usa
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That's what I'm leaning towards. My wife thought of this too, that's why I needed a second opinion lol
Thanks,
ozoner
 
  #13  
Old 09-18-17, 09:00 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 4,352
Received 116 Votes on 107 Posts
With no water in a building, that pressure switch should be in the on position all the time. The other pressure switch, wired in series, will then turn the pump on and off..
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: