Removing Pesticides from Well Water

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Old 01-01-18, 06:47 PM
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Removing Pesticides from Well Water

We put a bid on a home in NC that is about 1 mile from many apple orchards. We are getting the water tested. The realtor is telling me to walk from the deal if there are pesticides in the water. I'm also worried about Radon. The well on the property is 165 ft deep and was dug in 2013 with a flow rate of 10gpm. I've done a lot of reading but can't see to get a definitive answer on several questions. I hope that this forum can help me.

1. If there are large concentrations of pesticides can they be effectively removed with carbon block filtration?

2. I read that radon can be removed with carbon too. Is this true?

3. Should I walk from this house which is an amazing deal or stay and treat the water if there is a problem that shows up.

4. If ecoli is found will shocking the water take care of this or can it be an ongoing problem.

I was hoping that I could install a large whole house carbon filter for bathing and then a reverse osmosis for my drinking and cooking water. Do these remedies always work or are there some wells that are too contaminated and need to be dug deeper?
 
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Old 01-01-18, 07:36 PM
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Reverse osmosis will remove most pesticides but not all. An inexpensive UV setup will take care of the "living" nasties in the water. Grandular activated carbon will take care of radon, but honestly the risk is small there.

If there's E.Coli you should really determine the source. If it's there, it's gotta be coming from somewhere, as it doesn't just sit around in the well multiplying and waiting for someone to take a drink. RO+UV is a good combination for your drinking/cooking water. I do my dishwashing with it too since my well is extremely contaminated. I haven't died yet. That doesn't help you with the showers and stuff though. Just don't wash yourself with the non-RO water if you've got an open wound. Simples.

I don't see why you'd walk from it. If it's an "amazing deal", it sounds like you are already being compensated for a few problems you may have to solve after the purchase. If you have to drill a well, is the house still at least a "good" deal rather than amazing deal? If so, that's a no-brainer. I've never understood buyers who think I'm selling a house in perfect working order. No, I'm selling the house that I've got. Not a perfect one. If he wants something fixed he can fix it himself. Takes me longer to sell houses, but it's not a race for anyone but the realtors. They want to get sales closed as quickly as possible and with as little fuss as possible (even if it costs the seller buku bucks) so they can pocket their fat commissions and move on to the next guy.
 
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Old 01-01-18, 08:15 PM
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Core: Thanks for the insight? Is your well contaminated with pesticides? Do you use a filter? If so what is the maintenance involved? If I had to drill a new well the price would still be worth it. It's a foreclosure so we don't have a lot of time after our bid is hopefully accepted. The water is turned off now and the house is winterized. The bank will turn it back on for us for an inspection.
 
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Old 01-01-18, 09:44 PM
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My house was a foreclosure too. That's how I ended up here, but I practically stole the house and I've loved it since day 1. Even with all the troubles of country life.

No, I don't _think_ my well is contaminated with pesticides, but I don't think they test for that on tests around here unless you ask for it and pay more money. Iowa corn is different than orchards I'm sure. But my well is contaminated with much nastier stuff than that, because it's just an dug well (a pit!) wide open to atmosphere basically!. Total coliform levels very high. There is a cattle pasture across the road and the runoff from that drains straight towards my well, which is sitting in a swamp most of the year. Probably dead animals deep in the depths. Then there is the cistern which is mere feet from my septic tank.

If all I had to worry about was pesticides, I'd just drink them right up and ask for seconds. You have it good if it's a modern sanitary well.

I don't currently use a whole-house filter because the water is crystal-clear and charcoal won't solve my particular problems. The reverse osmosis filter maintenance takes like 5 minutes to change the filters every 6 months. I've got a Watts that uses proprietary filters, but next RO system I buy will use standard filters so I don't get gouged on filter costs. UV bulb needs to be changed annually and costs like $50 as I recall. Total cost to initially buy everything wasn't much more than $200, so it's not like a major expense.
 
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