Cleaning outlet baffle filter

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Old 02-19-18, 03:31 PM
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Cleaning outlet baffle filter

We have some water seeping up from area where the septic tank is.

The tank was last pumped in Nov 2015 and a new outlet baffle filter was installed at that time.

We were never told that the filter needed to be cleaned every 6-12 months. We are approaching 2 1/2 years. I suspect the filter is clogged and causing the tank to “overflow”

When the snow melts in a few days, I plan on diggIng up the outlet baffle access port and will attempt to clean the filter.

I’m not sure where the water line will be, but if it’s lower than the filter, I will remove it and clean it.

if the water level is too high, is a tank pumping needed with a subsequent filter cleaning?

I’ve seen too many videos where people pull out the filter and the solids go straight through the outlet pipe without the filter
 
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Old 02-22-18, 10:58 AM
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Imagine (don't try this at home) that the septic tank outlet filter was removed (and the rest of the plumbing and baffles were still in place) and no one had been using water in the house for a few hours..

The level of water in the septic tank should be where water would just start to exit the outlet pipe. This would generally be about 9 inches below the underside of the septic tank lid.

The amount of clogging of the filter could result in a resting level of the water a little higher but not always filling of the septic tank to the brim.

Before assuming there is a problem down in the leach field, you should have the septic system operating with a clean filter or a new filter for a week while you monitor the water level, each time after a few hours of rest with no one using water.
 
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Old 02-22-18, 04:50 PM
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If your septic tank is relatively modern, in good condition and you aren't putting things down the drain you shouldn't then the filter does not need regular cleaning. It's mostly a bit of insurance.

Some filters have a plastic ball in them that will automatically seal off the outlet when you pull the filter core out. Unfortunately some filters don't have this feature and if you pull the filter core you'll see the water rushing out to the septic system which also washes out stuff that should not be going into your leach field. Generally if you have water coming up from your tank you need to have it pumped. I've never had a filter clog and it was just as simple as cleaning the filter. The filter clogs because something is wrong. Another option is that your leach field is not able to keep up with the demands you are placing on it.

Some septic pumpers are very knowledgeable but often when you simply call to have your tank pumped you're just getting a guy who drives a truck, NOT a septic expert. If you want a inspection or consultation about your septic problems make sure you ask around and get someone experienced and good.
 
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Old 02-24-18, 01:18 PM
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I had the tank pumped on Thursday. The septic pumper said that the filter was dirty.

The next day, I opened the inlet access cover and noticed some sludge. I used a metal rod to get it loose, and about 10 seconds worth of water poured right out.

I suspect that the filter was clogged and caused the tank to overflow while allowing some sludge into the inlet pipe.

Good thing I checked the inlet pipe.
 
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Old 02-24-18, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by cmjb13
". . . the filter was clogged and caused the tank to overflow while allowing some sludge into the inlet pipe . . ."
You sure you mean "Inlet" Pipe ?

Your Filter should have been on the "Outlet" Pipe, at the opposite end . . . . right ?.
 
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Old 02-24-18, 03:33 PM
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The filter in the outlet baffle/pipe was dirty and needed to be cleaned.
The dirty outlet baffle filter apparently caused the tank to get full.

There is no filter in the inlet pipe, but I did see a clog, that when cleaned, caused a stream of water behind it to flow properly.
 
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