Apple Butter Recipe Using a Boiling-Water Canner

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What You'll Need
8 lbs apples
2 cups cider
2 cups vinegar
2-1/4 cups white sugar
2-1/4 cups packed brown sugar
2 tbsp ground cinnamon
1 tbsp ground cloves
Boiling-water canner
Glass canning jars
Lids for canning jars
Seals for canning jars

Use Jonathan, Winesap, Stayman, Golden Delicious, MacIntosh, or other tasty apple varieties for good results.

8 lbs apples
2 cups cider
2 cups vinegar
2-1/4 cups white sugar
2-1/4 cups packed brown sugar
2 tbsp ground cinnamon
1 tbsp ground cloves

Yield: About 8 to 9 pints

How to Make Apple Butter

Wash, remove stems, quarter, and core fruit.

Cook slowly in cider and vinegar until soft.

Press fruit through a colander, food mill, or strainer. Cook fruit pulp with sugar and spices, stirring frequently.

To test for doneness, remove a spoonful and hold it away from steam for 2 minutes. It is done if the butter remains mounded on the spoon. Another way to determine when the butter is cooked adequately is to spoon a small quantity onto a plate.

When a rim of liquid does not separate around the edge of the butter, it is ready for canning.

Fill hot sterile half-pint or pint jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace.

Quart jars need not be presterilized but should be clean and kept hot until filling.

Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel.

Adjust lids and process.

Process Times for Apple Butter in a Boiling-Water Canner

For a hot pack of half-pint or pint sized jars, process for:

5 minutes at 0 – 1,000 feet altitude
10 minutes at 1,1001 – 6,000 feet altitude
15 minutes at 6,000+ feet altitude

For a hot pack of quart sized jars, process for

10 minutes at 0 – 1,000 feet altitude
15 minutes at 1,1001 – 6,000 feet altitude
20 minutes at 6,000+ feet altitude

For a hot pack of quart sized jars, process for

10 minutes at 0 – 1,000 feet altitude
15 minutes at 1,1001 – 6,000 feet altitude
20 minutes at 6,000+ feet altitude

From the "Complete Guide to Home Canning." First published: January, 1993. Revised: 2015.
Courtesy of the USDA and National Institute of Food and Agriculture